27 April 2017

W is for Wallace James Lincecum. He Killed His Uncle? (A to Z)

Wallace James Lincecum, born 19 July 1908 in Denton, Texas, was a son of Val Dies Lincecum (who I was supposed to write about yesterday, but life happened) and Mary Elizabeth Murray (d. 1949).  He was also a half-brother to Edgar "Bud" Lincecum.  I wrote about Edgar's wife Ida Weeks for the letter I.

By the time Wallace was in his early twenties, he was working in the Texas oil industry.  Some job titles he had include oil drilling rig laborer, oil field rotary rig helper, and oil driller.  He seemed to make a life-long career of it.

Before 1935, Wallace married Sybil G. Flowers.  The couple had at least one son.

Something a bit more notable surrounded Wallace about the age of 23 – he witnessed the death of his uncle, Lucullus Garland Lincecum.

Dallas Morning News (Texas)
27 June 1931

Ambush Slayer Makes Getaway After Man Dies

Killer Rises From Ditch and Opens Fire on Truck Rider.

Special to The News.
HOUSTON, Texas, June 26 -- Officers Friday night were searching for the slayer of L. G. Lincecum, 55, of West Columbia, who was shot from ambush as he rode in a truck toward Houston near West Columbia, about forty miles south of Houston.

Wallace Lincecum, who is a nephew of the slain man, and who was driving the truck, said the slayer rose from a ditch by the side of the road and fired two shots.  Only one bullet struck Lincecum and it pierced his heart.

So close did the slayer stand that the elder Lincecum's clothes were powder burned.  A rain in the West Columbia section obliterated any trail the slayer might have left and Sheriff John McKinney of Brazoria County called for bloodhounds.

Wallace Lincecum could not identify the slayer nor give a motive for the killing.

Here is an image of L. G.'s death certificate.  Up the right side it was noted:  Murdered June 26 - 1931 - by parties unknown.  And you can see Lucullus's brother (and Wallace's father) was the informant.

lglincecumdc

But did Wallace do something more than witness the murder? The following news item from almost nine months after the killing seems to suggest he did.

Dallas Morning News (Texas)
6 March 1932

Lincecum is Given Five Years, Suspended

ANGLETON, Texas.  March 5 (AP) -- Wallace Lincecum, 22, was convicted Saturday of the murder of his uncle, L. G. Lincecum, and assessed a five-year suspended sentence.

The jury reported at 10:20 a.m.

The elder Lincecum was shot to death on a highway near here last June.  The prosecution sought to show the nephew slew him to benefit by a $500 legacy provided in the elder's will.

The defense pleaded the uncle, a Houston contractor, had committed suicide, offering depositions as well as witnesses.

Why the suspended sentence?

Wallace died 9 October 1967 in Houston, Harris County, Texas.  A few days later, his remains were laid to rest at Brookside Memorial Park in Houston.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order).  Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  My theme here is "kinfolk direct." Versus any name from the one name study, these genealogy and history posts all involve someone to which I am related.  You may follow along with me by RSS feed and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

I'm also participating with Southern Graves.  This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

25 April 2017

U is for Ulysses Tilley, Great-Grandson of Emily Lincecum (A–Z)

Individual Report - ULTilleyUlysses Lee Tilley is my third cousin.  He was born 23 May 1917 in Pearsall, Frio County, Texas to Valentine Harris "Vol" Tilley and Nancy Pairlee Yarbrough.  Ulysses's grandmother was Mary (Moore) Tilley, and Mary's mother was Emily Lincecum.

Truth be told, I don't know a whole lot about cousin Ulysses.  One interesting item is his entry in the United States World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946 database at FamilySearch.  This states he enlisted 25 May 1942 at East St. Louis, Illinois.  How or why he went there from Texas, I do not know.  The same record states Ulysses was divorced.

One other piece of information I have is undocumented, as I have been unable to get such information from other researchers:  Ulysses died in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, Mexico.

Looking through the lens of "presentism," this gives me pause.  What was he doing there? Just this past December, the U.S. Department of State issued an updated travel warning pertaining to Tamaulipas --

Tamaulipas (includes Matamoros, Nuevo Laredo, Reynosa, and Tampico): U.S. citizens should defer all non-essential travel to the state of Tamaulipas due to violent crime, including homicide, armed robbery, carjacking, kidnapping, extortion, and sexual assault. The number of reported kidnappings in Tamaulipas is among the highest in Mexico…Violent criminal activity occurs more frequently along the northern border and organized criminal groups may target public and private passenger buses traveling through Tamaulipas. These groups sometimes take all passengers hostage and demand ransom payments…Matamoros, Reynosa, Nuevo Laredo, and Ciudad Victoria have experienced numerous gun battles and attacks with explosive devices in the past year.

But Ulysses died in Nuevo Laredo 9 September 1960.  Maybe things were different there fifty-seven years ago.

One final record for Ulysses is his U.S. Military Headstone Application (via Fold3).  This tells me Cpl. Tilley was honorably discharged 26 October 1945, and was awarded the Purple Heart.

ultilleyheadstoneapp

Ulysses Lee Tilley rests under a flat granite marker with the engraving of a Latin (Christian) Cross at Laredo City Cemetery in Webb County, Texas.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order).  Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  My theme here is "kinfolk direct." Versus any name from the one name study, these genealogy and history posts all involve someone to which I am related.  You may follow along with me by RSS feed and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

I'm also participating with Southern Graves.  This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

24 April 2017

T is for Theresa Lincecum Martin, Famed Actress (A to Z)

"By his third wife Dr. Lucullus G. had a daughter, Teresa, who won considerable fame as a singer, musician, and Broadway actress."

tlmartin25aug1911Reading those words might send one down a rabbit hole. Wouldn't you agree? They can be found on page 87 of Lois Burkhalter's biography of Gideon Lincecum, father of said Dr. Lucullus G. I've tackled the research of cousin Theresa a couple of times, but still so woefully lack information.  I'm throwing out what I've got here, hoping someone can help.

First, according to the notes of Lois Burkhalter included in her book, the information she wrote about Teresa came from an interview she conducted with Dr. Addison Lysander Lincecum.  He was also a son of Dr. Lucullus G., by way of the second wife – Fannie Rainwater.

Dr. L. G. Lincecum had three wives and nine children.  Lee County, Texas records show the third marriage to be between L. G. Lincecum and M. E. Oliphant, taking place 29 December 1878.  Census records suggest her name to be Marie (or Mary) Emma.  L. G.'s last daughter, "Theresa Lincicum," is noted as a 6-month-old in the 1880 Lampasas County, Texas Federal census.

Theresa is not listed with the family in 1900.  Lucullus G. and Marie do have another child, though, also listed as Lucullus G.  (Later, I find newspaper articles to suggest this baby brother of Theresa's also went by "Lew" or "Louis.") The same census does note Marie/Mary had a total of two children, both living.  Dr. Lucullus G. Lincecum, father of Theresa, died a couple of months after this census was taken.

There is a marriage recorded for Miss Fanny Theresa Lincecum in Lampasas County, Tx.  She wed Mr. C. Martin 3 January 1900.  The couple is found boarding in the Aldridge Putnam household at Waco, Tx later in the same year per the census taker.  Claud, a telephone inspector, was there with Theresa L., b. November 1879.

According to a single, undocumented source via FamilySearch's "Pedigree Resource File," Claude Martin died 10 October 1904 at Chattanooga, Tennessee.  That's all I got for him.

A relatively wide search of online newspaper articles does confirm Miss Theresa Lincecum Martin had an acting career, performing in plays at least in the Midwest and Texas.  An item in the 17 November 1910 edition of the Palestine Daily (Texas) shows the actress's birthday coincides closely with what the census taker said:

Birthday Party.
Miss Theresa Martin, leading lady with "The House of a Thousand Candles" company, was given a birthday party by the union stage employes [sic] of the New Temple last night after the performance.  The event was pronounced a most enjoyable one by every one present.

Next, I have an ad from the 7 July 1911 edition of the Temple Daily Telegram (Texas):

tlmartin7jul1911

An article from the next day's edition says this:

AMUSEMENTS.

THE FLOWER OF THE RANCH.
…The Morey Stock is under the same management as "The Llower [sic] of the Ranch" company which played the New Exchange Theatre some time ago and have the enviable reputation of having the best of the best in every respect, regardless of expense, and to maintain the reputation that they have established, in offering Morey Stock company they offer Miss Theresa L. Martin, better known to the people of Temple as Miss Theresa Lincecum, daughter of the late Dr. L. G. Lincecum of Lampasas, who has been engaged for the leading roles and is featured in her own plays.  Miss Martin needs no introduction as her many friends and admirers have known her since childhood, and they will be pleased to have the estimable little lady with them for a week, and an opportunity to renew the pleasures of childhoods happy days.  Louis Lincecum, better known as "Son," is with the company, playing the leading roles opposite his sister, and the supporting company  is all that can be desired as they were engaged to support Miss Martin, and every one of her friends know that they must be good or they would not be capable of holding up their position if they were not better than the average as Miss Martin is certainly a star of no mean magnitude.  The Morey Stock offers Miss Martin in her favorite play, "Dixie Land," next Monday night, she having chosen this play for her opening performance so her friends may have a chance to see her to the best advantage.

The following is from the 25 August 1911 edition of The Walnut Valley Times (El Dorado, Kansas):

tlmartin25aug1911

And, finally, an article from the 7 September 1912 edition of The Macon Republican (Missouri) notes the following, with which I don't completely agree:

…Lincecum, by the way is Miss Martin's real name, the other being her stage title only.

I Have a Hunch (and a Ton of Questions)

I think it's possible Theresa and Lew's mother died sometime before or around 1910.  Did that (hypothetically) push Theresa into acting for financial reasons? Or was it a career she wanted and loved? I also think it's highly possible Mrs. Theresa Lincecum Martin married again.  But did she? The Texas Death Index database at FamilySearch has the following listing:

Frances Teresa Martin, d. 21 July 1980 at Tarrant County

If this is "my" Theresa, she would have been a few months shy of 101 years old at her time of death.  I'll admit it's unlikely, but not impossible.  Anyone out there have information to share about my cousin, the famed actress?


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order).  Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  My theme here is "kinfolk direct." Versus any name from the one name study, these genealogy and history posts all involve someone to which I am related.  You may follow along with me by RSS feed and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

I'm also participating with Southern Graves.  This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

22 April 2017

S is for Sioux & Sallie Lincecum Doran (A to Z Challenge)

Family Report - SLDoranSarah Matilda "Sallie" Lincecum was the last daughter born to Gideon Lincecum (1793-1874) and Sarah "Sallie" Bryan/t (d. 1867).  Records suggest daughter Sallie's birth year ranges from 1833 to 1850.  I think it can be narrowed to between 1837 and 1844.  Her birthplace is consistently Columbus, Lowndes County, Mississippi.

Sallie married William P. Doran in Washington County, Texas 10 December 1865.  Lois Burkhalter, using the journals of Sallie's father, writes about William, Sallie, and their marriage in the biography of Gideon Lincecum:

Gideon's youngest daughter, Sarah Matilda, always called Sallie, was married to William P. Doran, a telegrapher and newspaper man, on December 10, 1865...Again the bridegroom was one of Gideon's friends.  It was Doran who was responsible for the publication of many articles and letters by Gideon in Houston and Galveston papers.

Doran, known as "Sioux" because of a by-line he used for forty-one years as a writer for Texas newspapers, was born in Rochester, New York, May 3, 1836...He was with the Houston Telegraph at the beginning of the Civil War; he enlisted as a private in John P. Austin's company of the Rio Grande in March, 1861; he was honorably discharged at Fort Brown from William Christian's Company A, 2nd Regiment, Texas Volunteers, because of defective hearing.  Despite this handicap Doran became a war correspondent for the Telegraph...He died on November 25, 1901, and Sallie Doran died on April 11, 1919.  They had three sons -- Willard Richardson, Clyde Bryan, and Frank Lincecum Doran.

...[Sallie] enjoyed the companionship of her father and showed such an obvious reluctance to be married that Gideon was convinced she never would.  She rejected numerous suitors.  Even after meeting Doran she delayed her marriage a number of years to remain with her ailing mother, and a few months after her wedding returned to the old Long Point homestead to care for Sarah when her condition became critical.

When looking at the census records pertaining to Sioux and Sallie, I came across a familiar name next door to the Doran family in 1900 Waller County, Texas – George Qualls.  (I mentioned him in my post for the letter Q.) George had remarried after the death of Attie, who was Sallie Lincecum Doran's niece.

The three sons of Sioux and Sallie seemed to stick together after the deaths of their parents.  As far as I can tell, they stayed in Waller County.  That is, with the exception of Willard.  He is not listed with the family in 1900 or 1910.  But he returns to the brothers' home by 1920.

I haven't found anything suggesting even one of the brothers got married.  Unless you count Frank being described as a widowed negro for the 1940 Waller County census (I don't).

Willard Richardson Doran passed away 16 July 1921.  The dawn of each new decade after saw the death of another brother:  Clyde Bryan Doran on 30 January 1931 and Frank Lincecum Doran on 10 December 1940.

With no immediate family members left, the informant for Frank's death certificate was cousin Andrew Lysander Bradford.  Andrew was the son of Attie Campbell (mentioned above as the niece of Frank's mother Sallie) and her first husband, George Daniel Bradford.

The entire Doran family was buried, at the appropriate times, in Hempstead Cemetery at Waller County, Texas.  The graves of the last two brothers are, at this writing, unmarked.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order).  Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  My theme here is "kinfolk direct." Versus any name from the one name study, these genealogy and history posts all involve someone to which I am related.  You may follow along with me by RSS feed and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

I'm also participating with Southern Graves.  This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

21 April 2017

R is for the Roger Milam Lincecum Family (A to Z Challenge)

Family Report - RMLincecumRoger Milam Lincecum was born 16 June 1894 in Waelder, Gonzales County, Texas to Christopher Columbus Lincecum (1859-1926) and Nina Boyle Cook (1863-1952).

Partly due to wildly incorrect ages of children listed with Roger for the 1930 Orange County, Texas Federal census, some extra research was required in order for me to (hopefully) get this family right.

Roger's first marriage was solemnized 15 June 1918 in Orange County, Texas.  The marriage record, in the form of an index, provides the bride's name was Emandie Naquin.  A subsequent birth record for the couple's first child gives her name as Emondia Trahon.

For the year prior to Roger's marriage to Emondia, when he registered for the (WWI) draft in June of 1917, Roger was still in Gonzales County working his father's farm.

Roger and Emondia had two sons:  Harris Lamar Lincecum (1919-2003) and Robert C. Lincecum (1920-1989).  Robert preferred to spell his surname as Linscomb.  Interestingly, Harris Lamar corrected his birth certificate from Linscomb to Lincecum.

There were a lot of Linscombs in Orange County during the time Roger's family was there.  It will take some time to decipher them all.

I do not know what happened to Emondia, but do know Roger married again about 1928 to Bertha Peveto.  This couple had three children:  Julia Loraine (1928-2007), Roger Milam Jr. (1929-2000), and Charles Phillips (1930-2003).

During this time, Roger spent time working in the oil fields.  After the initial boom in the Orange County area, he moved on the other things.

After Bertha died in 1976, Roger moved to Buna, Jasper County, Texas – possibly to be with (or at least close to) his daughter.  Roger died there in 1980.  Both he and Bertha were laid to rest at Bland Cemetery in Orange.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order).  Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  My theme here is "kinfolk direct." Versus any name from the one name study, these genealogy and history posts all involve someone to which I am related.  You may follow along with me by RSS feed and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

I'm also participating with Southern Graves.  This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

20 April 2017

Q is for Mr. Qualls, Son-in-Law of Leonora Lincecum (A to Z)

Had to stretch a bit to get this letter!

About a week ago, for the letter L, I mentioned the notable Gideon Lincecum.  He was a Texas naturalist, moving there from Mississippi in the late 1840s.

When Gideon's wife died in 1867, he was a bit disillusioned with post Civil War Texas and ready for a new adventure.  So he moved to Tuxpan, Mexico.  Making the bold move with him was his daughter Leonora Lincecum, widow of George Washington Campbell, and her seven children.  One of those children was Attilia G. "Attie" Campbell – my third cousin.

While in Mexico, Attie married fellow American George Daniel Bradford.  He was a physician, born 1847 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.  From Lois Burkhalter's 1965 Biography of Gideon Lincecum:

George Bradford, a twenty-four-year-old doctor from Galveston, arrived in Tuxpan, met, and fell in love with Attilia Campbell.  Gideon considered him an industrious young man "having as good a knowledge of the science of medicine as is common among doctors." It was his proud duty to accompany George…to the alcalde's office where, in accordance with Mexican custom, the bans were issued.

This was approximately the year 1871.  In a relatively short time, maybe a couple of years later, George and Attie decided to return to the United States.  By the 1880 Federal census, they were in Memphis, Tennessee with five-year-old son Andrew Lysander, who had been born in Texas.

According to Ms. Burkhalter's book, Attie married again to Mr. George S. Qualls.  And, sure enough, a record exists for said marriage.  It took place in 1889 at Waller County, Texas.  Furthermore, the book mentioned Attie was dead by 1895.  But I was having trouble finding confirmation of this fact.

Turning to FindAGrave, I located Dr. George Bradford.  He died in 1886 and was buried at Prairie Lea Cemetery in Brenham, Washington County, Texas.  A family link led me to Attie.  She, too, was buried at Prairie Lea Cemetery upon her death in 1893.  But, her tombstone bears the name Attie G. Bradford.  No mention of her marriage to Mr. Qualls.

agbradford-fag

(Image courtesy of Amy the Spirit Seeker.)

Attie G. Bradford
Born in Long Point, Tex.
June 1, 1852
Died in Brenham, Tex.
Aug 12, 1893

I did find mention of the death of Mrs. Qualls in a newspaper, though.

Galveston Daily News (Texas)
13 August 1893 - pg. 2

MORTUARY

MRS. A. G. QUALLS.
Brenham, Tex., Aug. 12 – Mrs. A. G. Qualls, aged 41 years, died at 3 a. m. today at the residence of her sister, Mrs. Sarita Tamplett.

And, lastly, I was able to search the records of Prairie Lea Cemetery directly.  The only relevant result for "Bradford" is the good doctor (though it provides an incorrect death year) – resting in lot 45, section 3, range 1, and grave 5.  But a search for "Qualls" does give us the entry for Attie, as Mrs. A. G. – resting in lot 45, section 3, range 1, and grave 13.

I wonder if Andrew placed the stone for his mother.  Maybe he didn't care for Mr. Qualls?


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order).  Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  My theme here is "kinfolk direct." Versus any name from the one name study, these genealogy and history posts all involve someone to which I am related.  You may follow along with me by RSS feed and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

I'm also participating with Southern Graves.  This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

19 April 2017

P is for Pauline Lincecum James (A to Z Challenge)

Media0033Pauline (aka Perlina, Paulina) was one of at least five daughters born to Garland R. and Emaline Lincecum.  She was born in Texas likely between 1847 and 1849.

Pauline's father died when she was about six years old.  She stayed with mother Emaline for almost thirty more years, before finally marrying Coleman G. James about 1880.  He was approximately twenty years her senior, and it would be another fifteen years or so before they had a child – Maggie.  So Coleman became a father about age 69, and Pauline became a mother about age 48.  Not out of the realm of possibility, mind you, but a bit strange if you ask me.

I don't know much else about Pauline and Coleman.  I have yet to find either after the 1910 Nolan County, Texas Federal census.  They both likely died before 1920.

What makes cousin Pauline stand out in my family tree is her photo! I have precious few.  So any time an image accompanies a name,  I'm thrilled.  This photo was shared with me many years ago, and has since been widely disseminated online.  However, I don't know the provenance.  Happy to have it, regardless!


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order).  Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  My theme here is "kinfolk direct." Versus any name from the one name study, these genealogy and history posts all involve someone to which I am related.  You may follow along with me by RSS feed and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

I'm also participating with Southern Graves.  This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

18 April 2017

O is for Oscar Lincecum. Was He Adopted? (A to Z Challenge)

Oscar was born 13 December 1877 in Arkansas.  He is listed as a son in the Charles W. and Susan "Susie" Lincecum household for the 1880 Red River County, Texas Federal census.  What's interesting about that record are the birthplaces.  Charles and Susan were born in Missouri.  Yet Oscar was born in Arkansas, with his parents being born in Texas.

The 1900 Red River County Federal census is a bit more revealing.

olincecum-ason1900census

This record shows Susie did not have any children, and Oscar was noted as "A – Son." That leads me to believe he was adopted.

Another interesting thing to note about the 1900 census is it shows Oscar was two doors down from his future wife, Loretta Whitten.  That census was taken 25 June, and the couple was married a couple months later on 15 August.

There would not be a happily ever after, however.  By the 1910 Red River County Federal census, Loretta Lincecum was back home with her parents.  She was widowed before the age of 30, with four young children to care for – Noel, Ora, Charley, and Maxie.  The youngest child was born about five months before Oscar's death.

According to an image of his tombstone at Cuthand Cemetery in Red River County (via FindAGrave), Oscar died just six days after his 32nd birthday.  A short life left many unanswered questions.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order).  Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  My theme here is "kinfolk direct." Versus any name from the one name study, these genealogy and history posts all involve someone to which I am related.  You may follow along with me by RSS feed and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

I'm also participating with Southern Graves.  This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

17 April 2017

N is for Newton P. Hawthorn, Union Soldier (A to Z Challenge)

When researching my family history, I usually deal with Confederates.  So much so, that when I learned the husband of my 3rd cousin, Louisiana-born Newton Hawthorn/e, had been a member of Company B of the 2nd Louisiana Cavalry, I assumed he was part of the Confederate States Army.  But, oops! His tombstone bears a recessed shield, as opposed to the Southern Cross of Honor carved on the stones of Confederate soldiers.  Maybe I should look at this more closely…

But first, let me fill you in a bit more regarding Newton's vitals.  He was born 1845-1847 in Catahoula Parish, Louisiana to Albert (b. abt 1808) and Martha (d. aft. 1860) Hawthorn.  Newton spent all of his life in Louisiana, marrying Caledonia Lincicum/Lincecum there about 1868.  The couple went on to have up to 11 children.  I have seven names:  Daniel P., Pitsy M., Simeon B., Bullard T., Urettah A., Gorda Macune, and Ella V.

nphawthorncwenlistmentNow to return to Newton's service during the Civil War.  He enlisted in the Army of the United States of America at Natchez, Mississippi just after Christmas of 1863.  Natchez was about 75 miles from his home in 1860 of Alexandria, La.  An image of Newton's enlistment paper is found in his compiled service record at Fold3.

Though Newton was promoted to Sergeant just a couple of months after enlistment, his service would not be lengthy.  Newton was discharged at Morganza, La (near Baton Rouge) October 1864 due to illness of chronic diarrhea and hemoptysis.

After learning a little about Louisiana's place during the Civil War, Newton joining a Union company no longer seemed strange.  Per Wikipedia:

By 1860, 47% of the state's [Louisiana] population were enslaved, though the state also had one of the largest free black populations in the United States. Much of the white population, particularly in the cities, supported southern states' rights and slavery, while pockets of support for the U.S. and its government existed in the more rural areas.

Louisiana declared that it had seceded from the Union on January 26, 1861. New Orleans, the largest city in the South, was strategically important as a port city due to its southernmost location on the Mississippi River and its access to the Gulf of Mexico. The U.S. War Department early on planned for its capture. The city was taken by U.S. Army forces on April 25, 1862. Because a large part of the population had Union sympathies (or compatible commercial interests), the U.S. government took the unusual step of designating the areas of Louisiana then under U.S. control as a state within the Union, with its own elected representatives to the U.S. Congress. For the latter part of the war, both the U.S. and the Confederacy recognized their own distinct Louisiana governors.

Given the timing of Newton's enlistment, as well as his proximity to New Orleans, it probably should not be a surprise he joined the Union Army.

By June 1890, the time of the U.S. Census of Union Veterans of the Civil War, Newton had returned to his county of birth – Catahoula Parish, La.

Newton died March 1906.  A news article in the Times-Picayune (New Orleans, La) stated the following:  "During a difficulty near Wright, Walt Brister shot and killed his uncle, Newton Hawthorne."

Newton P. Hawthorn was laid to rest at Hawthorne Cemetery in Little Creek, La Salle Parish, Louisiana.  His gravesite is graced with a government issue military tombstone – recessed shield and all.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order).  Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  My theme here is "kinfolk direct." Versus any name from the one name study, these genealogy and history posts all involve someone to which I am related.  You may follow along with me by RSS feed and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

I'm also participating with Southern Graves.  This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

15 April 2017

M is for Montie B. Lincecum Saulsbury. Was She Poisoned? (A-Z)

Individual Report - MBLSaulsburyMontie – also called Montego, Monte, and Montia – was a daughter of Leander W. C. Lincecum (d. 1882) and Tennessee Levy / Levi.  Montie was born about 1867 in the state of Texas, and spent her entire life there.  She married Wiley Saulsbury at Bell County about a week before Christmas, 1885.  The couple had five daughters, including one who died from scarlet fever at the age of just four years.

After their marriage, Wiley and Montie remained at Temple in Bell County, TX for the next 20+ years.  Wiley was a livestock trader, and Montie kept house and raised the girls.  Wiley also served the town as constable for a number of years.  Some time after the taking of the April 1910 Federal census, Wiley died.  He was only in his mid to late fifties.

After Wiley's death, Montie moved to Waco in McLennan County, Texas.  Likely to be with a couple of her daughters that were living there:  Belle and Willa.

A "personal paragraph" in the social section of a 1921 Temple Daily Telegram newspaper, stated Mrs. Saulsbury was ill and had been so for some time.  She improved and life went on.

But not for too terribly long.  Mrs. Wiley Saulsbury died a few days before Thanksgiving just three years later in 1924.  Her last vital record provides a curious cause of death:  "Died suddenly, supposed to be accidental dose of Carbolic acid."

mrswsaulsberydc

So who administered the dose? Did Montie do it herself? Well, there is a rumor Mrs. Saulsbury was poisoned by her son-in-law.  But which one? For the 1920 McLennan County, TX Federal census, Monte was living with two sons-in-law, Will Parker (husband of Belle) and John H. Hall (husband of Willa).

I haven't uncovered any more evidence, yet.  So I'm still wondering who did the deed.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order).  Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  My theme here is "kinfolk direct." Versus any name from the one name study, these genealogy and history posts all involve someone to which I am related.  You may follow along with me by RSS feed and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

I'm also participating with Southern Graves.  This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

14 April 2017

L is for Lysander M. Lincecum: Killed by His Father (A to Z)

Individual Report - LMLincecumI haven't written much about Gideon Lincecum (1793-1874) in this space, mainly because I'm not sure there is anything to add to what is already out there.  He was a son of Hezekiah Lincecum and Sarah "Sally" Hickman.  Among many other things, Gideon was a well-known naturalist that explored much of Texas.  His writings have been pored over by countless people researching the natural history of that state.

Gideon was also a doctor.  He initially practiced "traditional" medicine, and later moved to prefer more natural remedies whenever possible.

Gideon married Sally Bryan (1797-1867), and the couple had thirteen children – all born prior to his move to Texas:  Lycurgus, Lysander M., Martha Ann Elizabeth, Leonidas L., Leander W. C., Mary Catherine, Lachaon Joseph, Lucullus Garland, Leonora, Cassandra, Sarah M., Lysander Rezin, and Lucifer Hezekiah.

Gideon Lincecum was also known to be very blunt.  This trait shines through in an 1866 letter to a friend (per Lois Burkhalter's biography of Gideon):

"We have lost four children, Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 13 are dead; balance are near and are going well enough…"

Lysander M. was born about 1818 and died in Mississippi in 1832.  In another writing, Gideon explains the death of his second born:

"I, with the assistance of another poison doctor, while I was practicing the old school of medicine, killed one of my children, fourteen years old, by administering the tobacco smoke injection."

I can't even imagine.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order).  Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  My theme here is "kinfolk direct." Versus any name from the one name study, these genealogy and history posts all involve someone to which I am related.  You may follow along with me by RSS feed and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

I'm also participating with Southern Graves.  This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

13 April 2017

K is for Kate and Kathryn Lincecum (A to Z Challenge)

Individual Report -KKlincecumFor this edition of the A to Z Challenge, here are a couple of women I don't know much about.  In fact, I know more about their husbands than I do them. Typical.

Kate

Kate Lincecum was born about 1898 in Gonzales County, Texas.  She was one of 10 or 11 children born to Lachaon Joseph Lincecum, Jr. (d. 1940) and Elizabeth Stubblefield.  When she was about 20 years old, on 19 April 1918 at Bexar County, Kate married a slender, blue eyed and light haired man named William Arthur Parker.  He was a son of Thomas Arthur Parker and Elizabeth Wheeler.  The young couple had at least three children.

Kate and William moved around quite a bit, all the while remaining in the great big state of Texas.  They lived in five counties over a 23 year period, staying in the central and north- and southeastern parts of the state.  William held several different occupations over those same years, finally settling on training racing horses by the taking of the 1940 census.  He appears to have held that occupation until his death in 1970.

A Social Security Death Index entry for Kate L. Parker provides a death date of 13 September 1981 for my 4th cousin (if that's her).

Kathryn

Kathryn Evelyn Lincecum was born 15 March 1912 in Henderson County, Texas.  She was one of at least three daughters born to Herbert Clarence Lincecum (d. 1921) and Florence Ellen Gordon (d. 1942).  Kathryn married Dorsey Taylor Kownslar 10 June 1939 in Navarro County, the couple having at least one child.

Kathryn was with Dorsey when he enlisted as a private in the United States Army 15 October 1942.  He would make the military his career.

Kathryn was Dorsey's second wife, and their relationship would (presumably) end in divorce, as he was married again before 1960.  Kathryn did not remarry, passing away at the age of 80 years on 14 August 1992.  Her remains rest at Athens Cemetery, in the county of her birth.

The relationship between Kate and Kathryn was 2nd cousins. I wonder if they knew each other.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order).  Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  My theme here is "kinfolk direct." Versus any name from the one name study, these genealogy and history posts all involve someone to which I am related.  You may follow along with me by RSS feed and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

I'm also participating with Southern Graves.  This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

12 April 2017

J is for John L. Lincecum. He Violated Quarantine Law. (A to Z)

Individual Report - JLLincecumDr. John Louis Lincecum was born 28 November 1855 in Washington County, Texas to Dr. Lucullus Garland Lincecum (d. 1900) and Edna Caroline "Kate" Lauderdale.

After 1870, John made his way deeper into southeast Texas to Victoria County.  An 1887 city directory shows he spent some time in Louisville, Kentucky as a student and later graduate of the state's University, after which he returned to Victoria.  He would stay there, practicing medicine, for the rest of his life.

According to the 1910 Victoria County, Texas Federal census, John was (at that time) on his second marriage.  The Texas County Marriage Index via FamilySearch.org shows Jno. L. Lincecum married Emma P. Phillips 20 March 1890 at Refugio County, a neighbor of Victoria.  I think Emma is his first wife.  She was with him during his trouble with the board of health:

Galveston Daily News (Texas)
1 March 1891

The Victoria Review remarks:
...Dr. J. L. Lincecum, who has been a practicing physician in Victoria a short while, was some time since confined to his rooms at the Rupley building and isolated, quarantined and guarded there by order of the health officer because he was adjudged by him to have smallpox.  One night, soon after, Dr. Lincecum with his wife eluded the guard around the building and made his escape to Goliad, where it is stated,  [?]  Lincecum became sick with smallpox.  On last Sunday Dr. Lincecum returned to Victoria, and was arrested on Monday by the authority of the health officer and board of health for violation of quarantine regulations.  Brought that day before acting Mayor Hexter, Dr. Lincecum was fined for his offense $100 and costs.  Failing to pay this fine imposed he was consigned to the city calaboose where he now lies.

Galveston Daily News (Texas)
6 December 1891

...A Doctor Charged With Perjury.
VICTORIA, Tex., Dec. 5. -- ...Dr. J. L. Lincecum, who was quarantined here during the smallpox excitement last winter and escaped from confinement, was indicted by the grand jury yesterday for perjury.  He was tried for violation of the quarantine law and acquitted, and the alleged perjury is in his testimony at the trial.  He was released on $1000 bond...

Unfortunately, I don't know the specifics on how that turned out.  The 1900 U.S. Federal census places J. L. Lincecum in the S. C. Phillips household at Victoria.  The relationship between the two is a word I cannot read that is struck through.  I can see, however, J. L. is listed as divorced.

About this time, John marries his second wife.  She was Ida Pauline Luter, born 1877 to French parents Marks Luter and Pauline Arnold.  It does not appear this couple had any children (more on that later).

I discovered another tidbit about John with another Texas newspaper item (from the Victoria Advocate) – he was apparently a bad driver:

JANUARY 12, 1911
Dr. J. L. Lincecum has ordered a $1400 E.M.F. roadster through L. G. Kreisle, and will receive it in a few days.  Dr. Lincecum has the reputation of being a reckless driver of horses, and the fact of him owning an automobile will doubtless cause considerable apprehension among pedestrians.  The doctor is fully aware of this, and said jokingly this morning that he would have his car equipped with a fender and employ a Red Cross nurse to ride with him.

drjllincecumdcFrom at least 1910 until his death, John and Ida resided at 403 East Forest Street in Victoria, Texas.  A news item regarding John's granddaughter – the well-known Texas artist Mrs. Willie Reed Rowe – states he practiced medicine in Victoria for 52 years.  John died in the city 14 October 1936, and was laid to rest the next day at Evergreen Cemetery.

Lucille Lincecum, Daughter of John

We know from Lois Burkhalter's 1965 book titled Gideon Lincecum, 1793-1874: A Biography (and the aforementioned news item) that John had a daughter named Lucille.  Some online family trees list her, also, as the daughter of Ida Pauline Luter.  I don't think that's so.  Born 25 July 1892, Lucille is more likely the daughter of Emma P. Phillips.

What is a little annoying is I cannot find Lucille in census records prior to her marriage to William Austin Reed.  I'm guessing she was with her mother, since she is never listed with John and Ida.  I did find in the Texas County Marriage Index mentioned previously, that Emma P. Lincecum married S. J. Stratton 16 January 1900 at Travis County.  Even with this information, I have yet to locate Emma or Lucille.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order).  Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  My theme here is "kinfolk direct." Versus any name from the one name study, these genealogy and history posts all involve someone to which I am related.  You may follow along with me by RSS feed and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

I'm also participating with Southern Graves.  This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

11 April 2017

I is for Ida Lee Weeks Lincecum (A to Z Challenge)

Individual Report - ILWLincecumIda Lee Weeks was born 1882-1883 in Callahan County, Texas to George W. and Delila C. Weeks.  Her parents were early settlers of the Admiral community in that county.

Ida Lee married Edgar "Bud" Lincecum 4 September 1904 in Callahan County, Tx.  He was a son of Val Dies Lincecum (d. 1958) and Annie Smith.  The young couple had five children over a fifteen year period.  Four of them are named here:  J. B. (d. 1982), Bonnie Belle (d. 1975), George Edgar (d. 1974), and Lila Mae (d. 2006).

Though Ida Lee, in her son Edgar's household, is listed as "widowed" for the 1940 Scurry County, Texas Federal census, I think she was likely divorced.  Her (former?) husband Edgar was listed a few counties over, with a wife named Beulah.

After almost thirty years of marriage, and in her early 50s,  my fourth cousin-in-law had to start her life over in the waning years of the Great Depression.  What strength she had to possess.

Based on obituaries for two of her siblings, Ida Lee was living in Arlington, Tx by the late 1950s.  She did not remarry.

Ida Lee Weeks Lincecum died in 1971, outliving Bud by almost twenty years.  Her remains rest at the Admiral Cemetery, in the community her family helped to build.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order).  Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  My theme here is "kinfolk direct." Versus any name from the one name study, these genealogy and history posts all involve someone to which I am related.  You may follow along with me by RSS feed and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

I'm also participating with Southern Graves.  This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

10 April 2017

H is for Henry Howcott Lincecum, Born on the 4th of July (A–Z)

My 4th cousin Henry was born 4 July 1893 in Lincecum – just outside of Selma – Grant Parish, Louisiana.  He was one of six sons born to Dixie G. Lincecum (d. 1952) and Mary Ida Brister (d. 1950).

Henry married Zilla, daughter of Jonathan and Margarette Sketoe, about 1918, and the couple had three children.  A son was Max Henry (d. 1981), and a daughter was Wytona (d. 2008).

While I wouldn't call Henry a "career" military man, he certainly stepped up at wartime.  He entered into service with the United States Navy mid-December 1917.  His initial training was at the Naval station in Great Lakes, Illinois.  After surviving that, Henry went on to spend five months at the Harvard Radio School at Cambridge, Massachusetts. Per Wikipedia:

Training focused on raising the student’s Morse Code operating ability, measured at the rate of words per minute. Students were drawn from Naval Reserve stations around the country. A recruit was sent to Harvard upon reaching an aptitude of 10 words per minute; when he improved to 22 words per minute he was graduated and immediately transferred to the fleet.

Henry was transferred to the USS Missouri, and served until the 11 November 1918 armistice.  The image below contains Henry's draft registration cards for both World Wars, as well as a Louisiana WWI service record.

Genealogy-004

When it came time to serve during World War II, Henry found a way.  It is documented, in the early 1940s, that the blue-eyed and blonde-headed Henry served his country and fellow veteran soldiers by working at the U. S. Veterans Hospital in Alexandria, Louisiana.

Henry H. Lincecum died 15 October 1968.  His remains rest at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Pineville, Louisiana.  Zilla joined him 18 years later.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order).  Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  My theme here is "kinfolk direct." Versus any name from the one name study, these genealogy and history posts all involve someone to which I am related.  You may follow along with me by RSS feed and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

I'm also participating with Southern Graves.  This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

08 April 2017

G is for Garland Norton Lincecum. He was Shot Accidentally.

Individual Report - GNLincecumGarland Norton Lincecum was born October 1872 in Texas to Lysander Rezin Lincecum (d. 1875) and Margaret "Maggie" Wood/s (b. 1846).  Garland was married at least twice, and possibly three times.

Before I get to that aspect of Garland's story, however, let me share this interesting bit of life experience he endured:

Caldwell News-Chronicle (Texas)
Friday, 11 May 1900 [via The Portal to Texas History]

Convict Guard Accidentally Shot.
Gonzales, Texas, May 9.--Norton Lincecum, a county convict guard, was shot accidentally Monday evening by A. C. McCown, a deputy sheriff.  Lincecum had the county convicts at work near Slayden, eight miles above here.  Three of the negro convicts made a break to escape and McCown and Lincecum were after them, Lincecum trying to head them off from the brush.  McCown fired one shot with his pistol and just as he fired Lincecum came up out of a small ravine and the bullet struck him on the right side of the stomach, passing through the body on the right side.  He is doing very well today and will be brought to town.

Back to those wives.  The conflicting information comes from census records.  The 1910 Gonzales County, Texas Federal census shows Norton and his wife at the time (Lizzie) were both on their second marriage.  Twenty years later, the 1930 Federal census for the same place states Norton was first married at age 30.  This was the time of his marriage to the aforementioned, supposed second wife.

Turning to marriage records, the first union is found in the Texas Marriages, 1837-1973 database at FamilySearch:  Garland N. Lincecum & Annie Kent, m. 15 September 1895 at Travis County.

A side note regarding this marriage is found in the 1900 Williamson County, Texas Federal census.  Norton is listed as single, versus divorced or widowed.

Document images are available for Garland's second and third marriages.  First is his union with Lizzie Fanning on 28 August 1904 at Gonzales County.

gnlincecum-lfanning

The third union was with Miss Mabel Lott on 15 June 1925 at Guadalupe County.

gnlincecum-mlott

With three marriages, one might expect at least a couple offspring.  But I have no concrete evidence of any children born to Garland and his wives.  There is one possibility – a son called Arnold born about 1901 is listed in the 1910 census.  But it is unclear if this is Garland's son from his first wife, or Lizzie's son from her previous husband.  Anyone know for sure?

Garland spent most of his life farming.  The 1900 census gives him the occupation of "Cotton Marker" (what that is, I do not know), and his World War I draft registration card says he was also a "Ginner," so maybe he dealt specifically with cotton much of the time.

Garland Norton Lincecum lived to the age of 82 years.  He died 19 June 1955 in Leesville, Gonzales County, Tx.  His remains rest at the Leesville Cemetery.

This isn't the first time I've written about a Garland Lincecum. An Individual Report for Garland Harvey Lincecum (1887-1912) is also here.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order).  Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  My theme here is "kinfolk direct." Versus any name from the one name study, these genealogy and history posts all involve someone to which I am related.  You may follow along with me by RSS feed and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

I'm also participating with Southern Graves.  This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

07 April 2017

F is for Florence Ellen Gordon Lincecum (A to Z Challenge)

This was a tough letter.  Not a lot of Fs in the family tree.  And with the few there are, there's not a lot of information to share.

Florence Ellen was a daughter of F. E. and Alice Wallace Gordon.  She was born 8 April 1873.  Her death certificate provides a birthplace of Arkansas, but other sources suggest Mississippi.

felincecumdc

(Death Certificate via FamilySearch.org.)

Florence married Herbert Clarence Lincecum 4 January 1896 in Hill County, Texas.  For the 1900 Texas Federal census, the couple was in neighboring Limestone County.  About 1910, Florence and Herbert moved a little to the northeast to Athens in Henderson County.  They resided there for the remainder of their days.  It appears the family even lived on the same street (Scott) for more than 20 years.

Florence and Herbert had five children:  Marcus Clarence, Lena/Lana M., Matson, Francis (Frances?), and Kathryn Evelyn.

[Side note:  Herbert, a son of Leonidas L. Lincecum and Sarah Virginia Lauderdale, was orphaned about the time he was becoming a teenager, aged 12 – 14 years.  He soon after went to live with his aunt and uncle, Mary (Lincecum) and James V. Matson.  Naming one of his sons Matson is possibly a nod to that couple who took him as their own.]

Herbert died 5 June 1921, leaving Florence alone when she was still a young 48 years old.  She did not remarry, but lived on for twenty more years.  Florence Ellen Gordon Lincecum died six days after her 69th birthday, 14 April 1942.  The remains of Florence and Herbert rest at Athens City Cemetery in Henderson County, Texas.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order).  Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  My theme here is "kinfolk direct." Versus any name from the one name study, these genealogy and history posts all involve someone to which I am related.  You may follow along with me by RSS feed and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

I'm also participating with Southern Graves.  This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

06 April 2017

E is for Earl Luke Lincecum x 2 (A to Z Challenge)

Earl was born 21 November 1897 in Texas to Luke A(nderson?) Lincecum and Ida A. Bynum (d. 1952).  He was one of at least eight children resulting from that union.

Earl married Grace Ophelia Kingrey about 1918, when his bride was just 17 years old.  This couple had at least five children.  Four of them were as follows:  Earl L. Jr., Rose Eva, Judy Jean, and Barbara Lucille.

ellincecumwwidraftImage at right is Earl Luke Lincecum's World War I draft registration card, dated 12 September 1918 at Canadian, Hemphill County, Texas.  (Though it should be noted his "permanent home address" was written to be Clovis, Curry County, New Mexico.)

Earl Sr.'s younger years were spent as a farm laborer and brakeman for the Panhandle & Sante Fe Railroad.  The family made its way to California from Texas by way of Oklahoma and New Mexico.  There, Earl Sr. settled on a career in police work.  He toiled at the Sacramento Police Department for at least thirteen years.

And that police department was where Earl met his second wife-to-be, Hazel Riley.  According to the 15 January 1940 edition of the Sacramento Bee (California):

"A romance that blossomed in the police department is scheduled to be climaxed within a few days by the marriage of Police Officer Earl L. Lincecum, 42, and Hazel Riley, 31, a clerk in the police record bureau.

The couple filed a notice of intention to wed in the county clerk's office Saturday, the same day upon which the divorce of Lincecum's former wife, Grace, became final…"

Earl Sr. and Hazel had at least one son, James Elton Lincecum, who died at the age of nine months.

The elder Earl Luke Lincecum suffered a heart attack "in the line of duty" 27 September 1946.  His remains were interred at the Masonic Lawn cemetery in Sacramento.

Earl Luke Lincecum, Jr.

As mentioned above, Earl Jr. was a son of Grace Ophelia Kingrey Lincecum (1901-1943).  He was born 18 May 1919 in New Mexico.  This Earl did marry, and had at least one child.  He was, for a time, occupied as a house painter.

Unfortunately, Earl Jr. would not live a long life.  He died 3 April 1958 at Redding, California.  The remains of this 38-year-old cousin of mine rest at Redding Memorial Park.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order).  Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  My theme here is "kinfolk direct." Versus any name from the one name study, these genealogy and history posts all involve someone to which I am related.  You may follow along with me by RSS feed and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

I'm also participating with Southern Graves.  This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

05 April 2017

D is for Diantha A. Lincecum Kynion (A to Z Challenge)

Individual Report - DLKynionDiantha Lincecum was my 3rd great grand aunt.  She was also a daughter of Harmon Linsicum/Lincecum (b. abt 1808) and Lucinda "Lucy" Thompson (d. aft. 1870).

I don't think my aunt's name was ever spelled the same way twice:  Dianthy, Darintha, Dianthia.  Add to that Linsicum and Lincecom. Her married name wasn't much better with Kenion, Kinion, Kenyon, and Kinyan.

Census records suggest Diantha was born 1837-1841 in Missouri.  I was in contact many years ago with a great, great granddaughter of hers that said she got full dates from an old family book.  If that's accurate, Diantha was born 11 May 1842.

Using that provided birthdate, it can be said Diantha was married at the age of 14.  Image of a Cape Girardeau County, Missouri marriage book shows she married Reuben R. Kynion 12 October 1856.  He was 5 to 7 years her senior.  The couple had known each other for a while before marriage, it seems.  The 1850 Cape Girardeau County census shows Diantha and her future husband were neighbors.

Diantha and Reuben possibly had six children:  Charles R., Mary L., Louisa E., Monroe, Julia, and Benjamin F.

Diantha lived the life of a farmer's wife, and spent all of it in Southeast Missouri.  And, according to census records, was not able to read or write.

My 3rd great grand aunt did not live very long, either.  I am not able to find her after the 1880 census, and her husband re-married in 1888.  The aforementioned family book gave her death date as 12 July 1886.  She was just 44 years old.


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order).  Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  My theme here is "kinfolk direct." Versus any name from the one name study, these genealogy and history posts all involve someone to which I am related.  You may follow along with me by RSS feed and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

I'm also participating with Southern Graves.  This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

04 April 2017

C is for Caledonia N. Lincicum Hawthorn (A to Z Challenge)

Individual Report - CNLHawthornCaledonia Nancy Lincicum/Lincecum was one of at least eight children born to Harmon (b. abt 1824) and Lucinda (d. abt 1872) Lincicum.  Online family trees put Lucinda's maiden name as Hawthorn, but I must admit such is my only source.

Born about August 1849, likely in Catahoula Parish, Louisiana, Caledonia's surname before marriage took on a few different spellings:  Lyncicum, Linscomb, and Lindum (in addition to Lincicum and Lincecum).

About the year 1868, likely in the state of Louisiana, Caledonia married Newton P. Hawthorn/e.  If Caledonia's mother's maiden name was in fact Hawthorn, and my current research is correct, Caledonia and her husband shared a grandfather – William Hawthorn (1777-1841).

Census records suggest Caledonia gave birth to 10 or 11 children.  But I have names for only seven of hers and Newton's offspring:  Daniel P., Pitsy M., Simeon B., Bullard T., Urettah A., Gorda Macune, and Ella V.

Caledonia lost Newton when he was shot and killed (supposedly by a relative) "during a difficulty" near Wright, La in March of 1906.  I have yet to find Caledonia after the 1910 La Salle Parish, Louisiana Federal census.  Husband and wife were laid to rest at the appropriate times at Hawthorne Cemetery in Little Creek, La Salle Parish.  Several of their children are there, as well.

Come back when it's time for the letter N to learn more about Newton Hawthorn and his Civil War service!


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order).  Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  My theme here is "kinfolk direct." Versus any name from the one name study, these genealogy and history posts all involve someone to which I am related.  You may follow along with me by RSS feed and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

I'm also participating with Southern Graves.  This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

03 April 2017

B is for Brazoria B. Lincecum Roberts (A to Z Challenge)

Individual Report - BBLRoberts"Lay me down, I want to rest."

Brazoria (also spelled Brassoria) B. Lincecum was a daughter of Garland R. Lincecum (d. 1853) and Emaline Jones/James (d. 1889).  Most online family trees and group sheets state the middle initial of B stands for Bryant, but I'm not so sure.  The only other name associated with Brazoria I have seen is Beatrice.  Brazoria's surname before marriage took on several spellings, as well -- Lincoln, Linscolm, and believe it or not, Fentycomb.

Though her tombstone provides a birthdate of 11 November 1835, I think the year of Brazoria's birth was more likely 1839.  She was born in Mississippi, but her parents took her and her siblings to Caldwell County, Texas by the the time the 1850 census was taken.

Brazoria was one of three Lincecum sisters to marry three Roberts brothers.  She chose Jacob F. "Jake" Roberts, and they were wed about 1856.  He was a son of Alexander Roberts (d. 1886) and Sabra Vise (d. 1855).  By 1880, the couple and their children were living in the Dripping Springs Village area of Hays County, TX.  Brazoria and Jake would call this place home for the rest of their days.

According to the 1900 census, Brazoria birthed a total of ten children.  Eight were living.  The names of those were Laura M., Ida, Daniel Frank, Eva/Ava, Maud/e, Stella, Kathryn (Kate, Katie), and Berta Beatrice.

Brazoria B. Lincecum Roberts died April 1921.  She was laid to rest at Phillips Cemetery in Dripping Springs.  Jake joined her a couple of years later.

B. B. Roberts
Nov 11, 1835
Apr 13, 1921
Asleep In Jesus
Mother

Words from an obituary for Mrs. Roberts follow.  They were published in the 21 April 1921 edition of the San Marcos Record (Texas).  I did not transcribe the article; it is from the work of Mary Kathryn Harris.

The death angel has visited our little village and taken from our midst one of our best beloved citizens, Mrs. J. T. [sic] Roberts, who died April 14th…

Mrs. Roberts was 82 years of age, having spent 64 years with her husband. She had been an invalid for several years. She bore her affliction so patiently, so uncomplainingly and retained her mental faculties to the end. She took much interest in public affairs, reading and discussing current events until three days before she died. She lived in this vicinity over 50 years, and not once during that time did she ever fail to respond liberally to any enterprise that was to the betterment of the community in which she lived…She had often expressed the wish to the writer that she might pass away before becoming helpless and that wish was granted, she walked to her bed a few minutes before she died and said to her daughter, "Lay me down, I want to rest," and passed out so peacefully.

Her funeral was one of the largest that has ever been in Dripping Springs…


Are you wondering what's up with all the "letter" posts? I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (links to official page). This challenge lasts through the month of April, with Sundays off.  Each day follows a different letter prompt, in order, from A to Z.  Click here to see all my letter posts on one page (in reverse order).  Though this is my second year in the challenge, it's my first with two blogs.  My theme here is "kinfolk direct." Versus any name from the one name study, these genealogy and history posts all involve someone to which I am related.  You may follow along with me by RSS feed and other social media platforms listed at the top of the sidebar.  I and other bloggers in the challenge on Twitter will also be using #atozchallenge.

I'm also participating with Southern Graves.  This blog as a whole is one of my themes – telling the tales of tombstones, primarily from those found in the Southern United States and usually the State of Georgia.

Are you participating in the challenge, too? Please leave a link to your blog in the comments, I'd love to pay you a visit.  Good luck to all involved!

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