28 January 2018

Individual Report for Ardenia T. Lincecum Bigham (1865-1940)

Individual Report - ATLBighamArdenia Tennessee "Tinnie" Lincecum was born 27 January 1865 in Williamson County, Texas.  She was a daughter of Leander W. C. Lincecum (d. 1883) and his fourth wife, Tennessee M. Levy (1836-1910).

Ardenia, at least in a few instances, was also known as "Dean." Other spellings of her name abound.  Some examples:

  • Ardenia Linccum
  • Ardena / Ardeana Lincecum
  • Lenie Lincescum
  • Ardenia Limcume
  • Tenysee M. Lincecomb
  • Ardenia T. Lincicum

On one occasion, I found Ardenia's maiden name written as "Lingstom."

At about age 17, Ardenia married George P. Bigham, son of Elihu "Ail" Bigham and Martha M. Cook, on 3 August 1882 in Williamson County, Texas.

Ardenia's older sister, Sallie Marcella Lincecum, had married George's older brother, Rufus Monroe "Rufe" Bigham, several years earlier.

sbchapmanArdenia and George had seven children.  One seems to have been born and died in between census years.  Researchers suggest the child was named Fountain Rogers Bigham (1892-1895).  The other six were as follows:

  • Lee Hugh Bigham (1883-1930)
  • Robert Monroe Bigham (1885-1962)
  • James Luke "Jim" Bigham (1887-1961)
  • Sallie Ann Bigham Chapman (1889-1969)
  • William Nix Bigham (1891-1975)
  • Belle Bigham Kenney Gonzalez (1896-1974)

George and Ardenia were married almost 48 years before being parted by his death in 1930.  Some marital strife from about five years into their partnered life was captured in the local newspaper.  At the time, the couple had two children, and Ardenia was pregnant with their third.

Temple Weekly Times (Texas)
Saturday, 9 July 1887 [via The Portal to Texas History]

A FAMILY TROUBLE.
A sad occurrence took place here yesterday.  A short time since, on account of domestic infelicity, Mrs. George Bigham, quit her husband's home and sought the home of her mother, Mrs. Lincecum, in this city, bringing with her her two young children.  Yesterday her husband followed her in and going to her mother's house succeeded in gaining possession of the two children, which he took with the intention of carrying back to his home.  After he brought them down town and placed them in his wagon, a warrant was sworn out by Mrs. Lincecum before Justice Lowry, charging him with assault.  Upon Constable Chinn making an effort to execute the warrant he met with the most determined resistance and it required the combined efforts of the constable, Deputy Marshal Baker and several citizens were summoned from the bystanders to effect Bigham's arrest, without resort to personal violence, which the officers sought to avoid.  Bigham was taken to the calaboose and locked up and his brother took charge of his wagon, team and innocent little children and carried them home, ignorant of the trouble which involved the father.  The scene on the street, upon the arrest of Bigham drew an immense throng together and universal sympathy was expressed for the little ones…

In 1924, Ardenia's sister Montie died at the age of 57 under a curious circumstance. You may read about it here in another post.

George P. Bigham died 7 January 1930 and was laid to rest at Lancaster Cemetery in Temple, Bell County, Texas.  Just a few short months later, Ardenia had to deal with the death of her first-born son.  Lee Hugh Bigham died 1 April 1930 at Dalhart, Dallam County, Texas.  His life was cut short by intestinal ulcerations and meningitis.

1930 continued to be a rough year when two months after the death of Lee, Ardenia had to bury her sister Sallie. Mercifully, the rest of Ardenia's children outlived her.  Per her death certificate, cousin Dean died 18 January 1940.  The gravestone at Lancaster Cemetery appears to have the incorrect death year of 1934.

30+ years later, Ardenia's death month and day would become my birth month and day.

Take all mistakes as good wishes.

Ancestry.com

1 comment:

M. Lincecum said...

Very interesting how domestic events were described back then. Genuine concern for the children. Not much innocence protection these days.

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