31 July 2016

Timeline Report for Fernandella Lincecum Roberts (1840-1933)

By Reading Associate 17 (own work), via Wikimedia Commons.Fernandella "Della" Lincecum Roberts lived to the age of 93 years, and surely saw a lot in those 9+ decades on earth.  Della's father, Garland Lincecum, was one of those who signed a petition to create Caldwell County, Texas.  Della lost her father at age 13, was married and had her first child by 18.  She would have her last child at age 45.  Della spent most of her life in the same Caldwell county, and was buried in a cemetery on land originally owned by her father.  (Courthouse image at right.)

Slavery was normal until she was 22.  She couldn't vote until she was 79.

Pattern:  Year / Age – Event – Date / Place

1840 – Fernandella Brazoria Lincecum was born – 3 July at Lowndes County, Mississippi

1846 / Age 5 – Garland moved his family and settled at what would later be Caldwell County, Texas

1846 / Age 5 – Mexican-American War – 1846-1848 / USA, Mexico

1848 – California Gold Rush – 1848-1855

1850 / Age 10 – Della was enumerated for the 7th United States Federal census – 9 November at Caldwell County

1852 – First Lone State State Fair – May / Corpus Christi, Texas

1853 / Age 12 – Crimean War – 1853-1856

1853 / Age 13 – Della's father, Garland R. Lincecum, died – 9 September at Lockhart, Caldwell County

1857 / Age 17 – Della married John C. Roberts – 9 August at Caldwell County

1858 / Age 17 – Della gave birth to son Jacob – 26 June at Caldwell County

1860 / Age 19 – Della was enumerated for the 8th United States Federal census – 20 June at Caldwell County

abt 1861 / Age 20 – Della gave birth to son Alexander

1861 / Age 20 – American Civil War – 1861-1865 / USA

1862 / Age 22 – Emancipation Proclamation – 22 September / USA

1863 / Age 22 – US Transcontinental Railroad – 1863-1869 / USA

1864 / Age 23 – Della gave birth to son Daniel Brazos – 7 April 1864 at Dale, Caldwell County, Texas

1865 / Age 24 – Assassination of US President Abraham Lincoln – 14 April 1865 / Washington, DC

1866 – Beginning of the era of Texas trail drives of cattle

abt 1867 / Age 26 – Della gave birth to daughter Louada

1869 / Age 26 – Suez Canal – Egypt

1872 / Age 31 – Della gave birth to son James T. – 11 February at Dale, Caldwell County, Texas

1873 – Buffalo Soldiers first posted in Texas

1876 / Age 36 – Della gave birth to son John B. J. – 13 October / Texas

1878 / Age 38 – Della watched her first son get married – 24 October at Caldwell County

1880 / Age 39 – Della was enumerated for the 10th United States Federal census – 12 June at Caldwell County

1886 / Age 45 – Della gave birth to her son Sullivan Ross – 13 January / Texas

1889 / Age 49 – Della's mother, Emmaline R. Jones Lincecum, died – 7 July at Caldwell County

abt 1893 / Age 52 – Della watched her son Daniel get married

abt 1894 / Age 53 – Della watched her son James T. get married

1897 / Age 57 – Della watched her son Alexander get married – 27 October at Caldwell County

1898 / Age 57 – Spanish-American War – April thru August / USA, Cuba

1900 / Age 59 – Della was enumerated for the 12th United States Federal census – 8 June at Caldwell County

1900 – "Great Hurricane" kills 6,000 – 8 September / Galveston, Texas

1901 – Large discovery of oil in Texas – 10 January / Beaumont, Texas

1901 / Age 61 – Assassination of US President William McKinley – 6 September at Buffalo, New York

1903 / Age 63 – Wright Brothers First Flight – 17 September at Kitty Hawk, Dare County, North Carolina

1908 / Age 68 – Ford Model T Manufactured – 1908-1927 / Detroit, Michigan

1910 / Age 69 – Della was enumerated for the 13th United States Federal census – 10 May 1910 at Caldwell County, Texas

1912 / Age 71 – Titanic Disaster – April / Atlantic Ocean

1914 / Age 73 – World War I – 1914-1918 / Europe

1919 – Prohibition begins in Texas

1919 / Age 78 – Della's husband of 61 years, John Roberts, died – 25 March at Caldwell County, Texas

1920 / Age 79 – Women in the United States receive the right to vote

1920 / Age 79 – Della was enumerated for the 14th United States Federal census – 2 January at Wilson County, Texas

1924 – First woman governor elected in Texas

1925 / Age 84 – Della's son John B. J. died – 23 January

1929 / Age 88 – The Great Depression – 1929 until her death / USA and Europe

1930 / Age 89 – The Holocaust – 1930 until her death / Eastern Europe

1930 / Age 89 – Della was enumerated for the 15th United States Federal census – 9 April at San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas

1931 / Age 90 – The Dust Bowl – 1931 until her death / Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas

1933 / Age 93 – Fernandella Lincecum Roberts died – 9 September at San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas.  She was laid to rest in Lincecum-Roberts Cemetery at Lockhart, Caldwell County.

Sources available upon request.

See also:
- Individual Report for Fernandella Brazoria Lincecum Roberts (1840-1933)

30 July 2016

Individual Report for Fernandella Brazoria Lincecum Roberts (1840-1933)

Fernandella "Della" Brazoria Lincecum was born 3 July 1840 in Lowndes County, Mississippi to Garland R. Lincecum and Emmaline Jones.  By the time Della was six years old, Garland had moved his family to Caldwell County, Texas.  This is where she would marry John C. Roberts, son of Alexander and Sabra, on 9 August 1857.

Della and John would eventually have seven children, 6 boys and 1 girl:  Jacob Garland, Alexander, Daniel Brazos, Louada, James T., John B. J., and Sullivan Ross. At least two of her sons would have her listed on their death certificates as Della Linscomb.

Fernandella Lincecum Roberts died at the age of 93 years on 9 September 1933 in San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas.  She was laid to rest in Lincecum-Roberts Cemetery, the sacred land first owned by her father, in Caldwell County.  50+ years went by without a tombstone to mark Della's grave.  Roberts descendants got together and gave her one some time around 1985.  An image of this granite marker is available on FindAGrave.

Individual Facts:

  • Residence:  1846 / Caldwell County, Texas
  • Census:  9 November 1850 / Caldwell County, Texas
  • Census:  20 June 1860 / Caldwell County, Texas
  • Occupation:  June 1880 / Keeping House in Caldwell County
  • Census:  12 June 1880 / Caldwell County, Texas
  • Census:  8 June 1900 / Caldwell County, Texas
  • Census:  10 May 1910 / Caldwell County, Texas
  • Residence:  April 1919 / Dale, Caldwell County, Texas
  • Census:  2 January 1920 / Wilson County, Texas
  • Census:  9 April 1930 / San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas
  • Address:  September 1933 / 319 Stieren St., San Antonio, Texas

Sources available upon request.

mrsdroberts-mortwarrantNotes:

  • From Mrs. Della Roberts' "Widow's Application for a [Confederate] Pension" --
    "I am the widow of J. C. Roberts, deceased, who departed this life on the 25th day of March, A.D. 1919, in the county of Caldwell in the State of Texas."

    "I was married to him on the 9th day of August, A.D. 1857, in the county of Caldwell in the State of Texas."

    The "Mortuary Warrant" application for the government to cover burial expenses (image at right from Ancestry) submitted by Della's son S. R. Roberts provides a physician report: "Fractured Right hip, Senility, Arteriosclerosis, & Chronic Myocarditis."

    *Digital images of Della's eight-page Confederate widow's application are available online in the Alabama, Texas and Virginia Confederate Pensions, 1884-1958 database.

  • From death certificate:
    Cause of death = Fracture of Rt hip (10 mo ago)
    Contributory = Senility & Myocardial failure
    [Regarding hip fracture] Accident; injury date 9 Nov 1932 at San Antonio (home). "Pt. fell & fractured Rt. hip."
    *Digital image of Della's death certificate available online at FamilySearch.

Take all mistakes as good wishes.

See also:
- Timeline Report for Fernandella Lincecum Roberts (1840-1933)

28 July 2016

Individual Facts Report for Earl L. Lincecum, Jr. (1919-1958)

Cloud's Rest at Yosemite
Earl L. Lincecum, Jr. was born 18 May 1919 in New Mexico to Earl Luke Lincecum and Grace Ophelia Kingsey / Kingrey.  Barbara Lucille Lincecum Thurman was another child of Earl and Grace.

Earl Jr. did marry, and he and his wife had a least one child.

Earl L. Lincecum, Jr. died 3 April 1958 in Shasta County, California, and was laid to rest at Redding Memorial Park.  His obituary was run in the 5 April 1958 Sacramento Bee (California), and is available for viewing online at GenealogyBank.  A digital image of Earl's well-rusted funeral marker is online at FindAGrave.

Individual Facts:
  • Census:  2 April 1930 / Sacramento, California
  • Residence:  April 1935 / Sacramento, California
  • Occupation:  April 1940 / House Painter at Shasta County, California
  • Census:  5 April 1940 / Redding, Shasta County, California
  • Residence:  abt February 1943 / Redding, Shasta County
  • Residence:  abt September 1946 / Redding, Shasta County

Sources for report available upon request.
Image source: Cloud's Rest from the Lower Bridge, by George Fiske, courtesy, California Historical Society, CHS201`4.1603.jpg.

17 July 2016

Taxi Driver Shot, Found on Steps: the 1932 Death of Robert H. Tamplin

Robert H. Tamplin was born 13 October 1895 in Georgetown, Williamson County, Texas to R. H. Tamplin and Daisy Lincecum.  Young Robert spent his pre-adult years working as a stock clerk for the Joske Bros. department store.  He also completed a relatively short stint in the U.S. Army.  By the time he was 27, Robert was working as a chauffer / taxi driver in the San Antonio area of Bexar County, Texas.

Robert married at least once, but was divorced at the time of his death.  His untimely demise occurred less than two months after his 37th birthday, and just two weeks before Christmas.

San Antonio Express (Texas)
12 December 1932 - pg. 1 [Viewed online at GenealogyBank's Newspaper Archive.]

TAXI DRIVER SHOT, FOUND ON STEPS

Cab Found More Than Mile From Scene, No Witnesses Discovered

With a bullet wound in the back, the body of Robert H. Tamplin, 30, 306 North Street, was found upon the steps of the residence of Louis Granato, 410 Stonewall Street, Sunday morning, shortly after residents reported hearing a dispute and an automobile hastening away.  Granato telephoned the sheriff's office there was a drunk man lying on the steps.

Mystery still clouded the shooting Sunday night as deputy sheriffs said they had been unable to find a clue and the fact that Tamplin's watch, a ring and 80 cents in change was found on the body.  Residents of the house where the body was found could give no information as to how many men were in the party heard quarreling at the doorway and none had heard anything which was said.

Tamplin was a driver for the Yellow Line Company and was said to have left the office at 11:55 in answer to a call for a cab.  The call came from a pay station and person calling did not ask for any driver by name, it was declared, and simply requested that a cab be sent to the Riverview Apartments, 106 West Pecan Street.  Tamplin was not seen again alive by any one as far as the officers had found.

The cab which Tamplin drove was found early Sunday morning on South Flores more than a mile from the scene of the shooting, leaving officers to believe the man's slayers had driven away in his own car and abandoned it later.  The car was not damaged.

Tamplin is survived by his mother, Mrs. Daisy Tamplin, of San Antonio, and two brothers, Lloyd Tamplin of Anderson, S.C., and R. D. Tamplin of Inglewood, Calif.  Funeral services will be held Monday afternoon with Rev. W. A. Pearson of St. Paul's Episcopal Church officiating.

Robert's death certificate via FamilySearch.org lists cause of death as Gun shot wound in right side of Back.  It was noted as Homicide.

rtamplindc

Robert was laid to rest at Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery in San Antonio, Texas.  A nice image of his government issued tombstone may be viewed on FindAGrave.  The inscription follows:

Robert H. Tamplin
Texas
Cook
Motor Trans. Corps
December 11, 1932

16 July 2016

Does the Life of Robert H. Tamplin Typify the 1800s Wild, Wild West?

cowboyThe very little research conducted into the life of Robert H. Tamplin produced some very interesting newspaper articles.  (All found at The Portal to Texas History.) When I first started reading, I wondered to myself if the family was known as the Tamplin Gang or something such as that.  It seems father R. F. and his two eldest sons, Robert and Rufus, were always involved in something.  And that something seemed to often be pushing up against the law.  Maybe even crossing it.

I will say there were some instances where Robert was accused of things and later acquitted, or found not guilty.  And I did come across a short article noting the Tamplin family to be well respected throughout Washington County, Texas.

Who knows? Maybe Robert's life typifies the era of the 1800s wild, wild west.  Remember, anything happening after 1888 (at minimum) had a direct effect on his wife, Daisy Lincecum, who was just 23 when she married Robert.

Take all mistakes as good wishes.

Notes:

- The Daily Banner (Brenham, Texas)
Thursday, 27 February 1879

PRETTY CLOSE. -- On Wednesday, after Mr. R. F. Tamplin [Robert's father] had been fined in the mayor's court for unlawfully carrying a concealed weapon, he came up town and abused the officers who arrested him, and being warned by them several times not to create a disturbance, he displayed his pistol -- which had been returned to him under the decision of the appellate court that no weapon should be confiscated -- officer Buster informed Mr. Tamplin that he was doing wrong and to put the weapon in his pocket, or give it to his son.  He replied using abusive language, and the officers then arrested him, he showing fight.  His son Robert, about 17 years old, then drew and cocked on the officers a single-barrelled derringer pistol.  The city marshal grabbed him to prevent his shooting.  A scuffle ensued during which the derringer "went off" the ball entering a side-pocket in the marshal's coat and severely wounding a pocket full of papers.  It was a very narrow escape.  Both parties were arrested and placed under bonds of $50 each for their appearance on Saturday next.

- Brenham Daily Banner (Texas)
Saturday, 20 September 1884

GIN BURNED. -- On Friday morning Robert Tamplin's gin in the Gay Hill neighborhood was discovered to be on fire.  In a short time it was in ashes.  The gin and machinery were new having lately been completed.  It cost about $3000 and was insured for $1800 in the Southern and Hibernian companies of New Orleans.

[Robert's father was shot and killed May 1883.  This may have been a "family" gin, originally belonging to the elder Robert.]

- Brenham Daily Banner (Texas)
Thursday, 22 October 1885

District Court.
Wednesday. -- State vs. R. H. Tamplin, theft of cattle, continued by agreement.

- The Galveston Daily News (Texas)
5 December 1886

Dismissed by the Grand Jury.
DALLAS, Tex., December 4. -- Mr. Robert Tamplin, of Brenham, who was arrested and brought here last Wednesday, charged with stealing some clothes in this city last August, has been dismissed by the grand jury, after a thorough investigation of the charge.  Mr. Tamplin belongs to a most respectable family in Washington, and is considered one of Brenham's best citizens.

- Galveston Daily News (Texas)
16 November 1891

Two Severe Cuts.
BRENHAM, Tex., Nov. 15. -- A rather serious affair took place at the Santa Fe saloon at 2 o'clock this morning, in which several persons were seriously hurt.

R. S. Farmer and Dr. Rufus B. Tamplin [brother of Robert] had had a difficulty up town early in the night, in which, it is said.  Dr. Tamplin drew a knife, but did not attempt to use it.  Farmer did not see the knife, but some one told him of it, and he procured a pistol and followed the docdor [sic] down to the saloon.

Eye witnesses say that immediately on entering the saloon door Farmer drew his pistol and told Tamplin to "hand over that knife." Robert Tamplin, a brother of the doctor, was standing at the bar drinking a glass of water.  When Farmer presented the pistol at his brother's head he threw the glass and hit Farmer on the side of the head.

The pistol was discharged at the same instant, the bullet going through the side of the house.  Robert Tamplin, after throwing the glass, followed it up by clinching with Farmer and pushing him out of the door.

Leslie Greyton, a bystander, jerked Farmers' [sic] pistol out of his hand, and Dr. Tamplin rushed out to help his brother.  He drew a knife and stabbed Farmer twice, once in the left arm, making a gash from the point of the elbow to the wrist.  Another slash fell on the back of the neck, extending from the edge of the hair on the right side in a slanting direction clear to the middle of the left side of the throat, missing the jugular vein only narrowly.

The latter  cut went to the bone and is rather serious.

Harry Swain, another bystander, struck Robert Tamplin over the head with a heavy cane, knocking him loose from Farmer and the row ended.

After the difficulty it was found that Farmer had two bad cuts.  Robert Tamplin had a gash on the head from the cane blow.  P. A. Henderson's head had stopped the glass as it glanced from Farmer's head, and a good-sized lump was the result.  Two or three others were slightly cut on the face and hands from bits of broken glass.

- Brenham Daily Banner (Texas)
26 March 1892

LOCAL NEWS.

The Tamplin Case.
The case of the State vs. R. H. Tamplin, charged with swindling, growing out of a mortgage made to Schmid Bros., on stock that Tamplin claimed died before the foreclosure and judgement against him, was called in the District court Friday morning, but Mr. Tamplin having gone out in the country about 16 miles was not able to get in on time and a forfeiture of his bond was entered, but upon his arrival at 10:15 the forfeiture of his bond was set aside, and the case went to trial.

District Attorney King opened the argument for the State, Judge Kirk appearing in an able argument for the defense, County Attorney Rogers closing.

Court adjourned until this morning, when the Judge will charge the jury in the case.

[Article in next day's paper says jury returned a verdict of not guilty.]

- Denton County News (Denton, Texas)
30 March 1893

A Fatal Fight.
GEORGETOWN, Tex March 24. -- Hightower, a boy 17 years of age was killed yesterday.  Hightower and Bob Tamplin, living near New Liberty Hill, quarreled in the morning about Hightower's sheep eating Tamplin's corn.  About noon Tamplin took his gun and left home, saying he was going to shoot squirrels.  Soon after this shots were heard.  Hightower was found dead and Tamplin wounded in the shoulder.  Hightower's clothing and one ear were badly burned.  He was a shepherd on a ranch owned by Dock Davis of Round Rock.  Tamplin has a wife and one child.  He has been arrested.

It seems Robert H. Tamplin was under the age of 40 when he died.  Does anyone know the cause of his death?

15 July 2016

Individual Facts Report for Robert H. Tamplin, Husband of Daisy Lincecum

Robert H. Tamplin was, according to the 1880 U.S. Federal census, born about 1862 in Texas to Robert F. and Sarah Tamplin.  The young Robert first married Mayry Matilda Shannon 28 April 1881 in Washington County, Texas.  Several years later, he married Daisy Lincecum on 27 November 1888.  Daisy was a daughter of Lysander R. Lincecum and Margaret Wood.

Robert and Daisy had at least four children.  Three sons were Lloyd Tamplin, Robert H. Tamplin, and Roy Davis Tamplin.  By 1900, Daisy was a widow.

Individual Facts:

  • Census:  June 1880 at Independence, Washington County, Texas
  • Occupation:  June 1880 at Washington County, Texas / Worked on Farm

Sources available upon request.

I haven't conducted much research into the life of Robert H. Tamplin, but I discovered several interesting newspaper articles I will share tomorrow in a notes report.

14 July 2016

Individual Report for Daisy Lincecum Tamplin (1865-1958)

Daisy Lincecum was born 25 August 1865 in Long Point, Washington County, Texas to Lysander Rezin Lincecum and Margaret "Maggie" Wood.

Daisy married Robert Tamplin 27 November 1888 in Washington County, and they had at least four children.  Three sons were Lloyd Tamplin, Robert H. Tamplin, and Roy Davis Tamplin.  Daisy was widowed by 1900, but did not marry again.

Daisy died 2 April 1958 in Winston-Salem, Forsyth County, North Carolina.  Her body was cremated by Bowman-Gray School of Medicine (NC).

Individual Facts:

  • Census:  25 June 1880 at Washington County, Texas
  • Occupation:  June 1900 / House Keeper in Gonzales, Texas
  • Census:  27 June 1900 at Gonzales, Texas
  • Address:  1903 / 303 E. 7th, Austin, Texas
  • Occupation:  1903 / Machine Hand at Bosche's Troy Laundry, Travis County, Texas
  • Address:  1910 / 204 Av. D, San Antonio, Texas
  • Census:  23 April 1910 at San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas
  • Address:  1919 / 122 Rusk, San Antonio, Texas
  • Census:  2 January 1920 at San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas
  • Address:  1921-1922 / 122 Rusk, San Antonio, Texas
  • Address:  1924 / 122 Rusk, San Antonio, Texas
  • Address:  1926 / 122 Rusk, San Antonio, Texas
  • Census:  5 April 1930 at San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas
  • Address:  April 1930 / 306 North Street, San Antonio, Texas
  • Residence:  December 1932 / San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas
  • Address:  abt December 1932 / 306 North Street, San Antonio, Texas
  • Residence:  April 1935 / San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas
  • Address:  1940 / 869 West Fifth Street, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
  • Census:  1940 at Winston-Salem, Forsyth County, North Carolina
  • Residence:  abt 1958 / Lewisville, Forsyth County, North Carolina

It looks as though Daisy spent at least 25 – 30 years living in San Antonio.  Using Google Maps, and the addresses of 204 Av. D and 306 North Street, I figure Daisy was in the present-day place of Converse, Texas.  This is like a suburb of San Antonio.  Here is an image of what the area of 306 North Street looked like April 2011.

Notes:

  • According to the 1900 Gonzales County, Texas Federal census, Daisy (already widowed) was staying with her uncle, L. J. Lincecum.
  • According to the 1910 Bexar County, Texas Federal census, Daisy had four children.  Three were living.
  • Daisy was the informant on her son Robert's death certificate.  She was living with Robert at the time of his death.
  • According to the 1940 Forsyth County, North Carolina Federal census, Daisy had 7 years of education.
  • Per her death certificate, Daisy passed away at Maplegrove Rest Home in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

13 July 2016

Individual Report for Cad Lincecum (b. abt 1851)

Cad Lincecum was born about 1851 in Alabama to Rezin Bowie Lincecum and Annisa Bowie.  I have not been able to locate Cad after the 1860 U.S. Federal census.

Individual Facts:

  • Race:  July 1860 / Catahoula Parish, Louisiana / Mulatto
  • Census:  7 July 1860 / Catahoula Parish, Louisiana

Sources available upon request.

Notes:

- Noted on the 1860 Catahoula Parish, Louisiana U.S. Federal census record for Cad Lincecum is Free Born.

freeborn-rlincecumfamily

Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry Operations, Inc., 2009.

Take all mistakes as good wishes.

12 July 2016

Individual Facts Report for Barbara Lucille Lincecum Thurman (1930-1997)

Barbara Lucille Lincecum was born 18 February 1930 in Sacramento, California to Earl Luke Lincecum and Grace Ophelia Kingrey/Kingsey.  Earl and Grace were both dead before Barbara reached the age of 17.

Barbara was married at least twice.  She died 23 February 1997 in Placer, California.

Individual Facts:

  • Census:  2 April 1930 / Sacramento, California
  • Census:  5 April 1940 / Sacramento, California
  • Residence:  abt February 1943 / Sacramento, California

Sources available upon request.

11 July 2016

Individual Report for Letha Elizabeth Gandy Lincecum (1873-1959)

mrsallincecum1913Letha Elizabeth Gandy was born 25 September 1873 at Gandy Bend, Lavaca County, Texas to Barnabas Pipkin Gandy and Mary Helena Allen.  Letha died 27 December 1959 in El Campo, Wharton County.  Burial was in Gandy Cemetery at Gandy Bend.

Letha married Addison Lysander Lincecum 24 October 1896 in Lavaca County.  They had three children:  Barnabas Gandy Lincecum, Ruth Elizabeth Lincecum, and Addison Turney Lincecum.

Photo at right from The Houston Post (Texas), Vol. 28, Ed. 1 Sunday, 14 September 1913.  Accessed 3 July 2016, University of North Texas Libraries, "The Portal to Texas History," texashistory.unt.edu .

Individual Facts:

  • Census:  4 June 1880 / Lavaca County, Texas
  • Census:  23 June 1900 / Jackson County, Texas
  • Residence:  1909-1959 / El Campo, Wharton County, Texas
  • Census:  28 April 1910 / El Campo, Wharton County, Texas
  • Census:  21 January 1920 / El Campo, Wharton County, Texas
  • Census:  19 April 1930 / El Campo, Wharton County, Texas
  • Residence:  1935 / El Campo, Wharton County, Texas
  • Census:  24 June 1940 / El Campo, Wharton County, Texas (300 Mechanic St.)
  • Occupation:  abt 1959 / Wharton County, Texas / Housewife
  • Address:  abt 1959 / El Campo, Wharton County, Texas (302 S. Mechanic St.)

Sources available upon request.

Notes:

- "Doctor Lincecum married October 24, 1897, Miss Letha Gandy.  Mrs. Lincecum is a Texas author, has been an investigator and writer on historical topics, and many of her writings have been published and have secured for her special recognition and honors from the university and other institutions.  Her great-grandfather, John Gandy, of North Carolina, was soldier in the American Revolution.  Her parents were Barnabas P. and Mary (Allen) Gandy, her father a native of Alabama and her mother of Mississippi.  Doctor and Mrs. Lincecum have three children, Barney, Ruth and Addison, Jr.  Barney of Houston.  Ruth is the wife of Ray Hilton, a chemist at Houston, and they have a daughter, Dorothy and son, Addison III.  Addison, Jr. is a pupil in the public schools at Washington, DC." [Source:  Texas Under Many Flags by Clarence Wharton.  American Historical Society, 1930.  Page 124.]

- Letha's cause of death was "arteriosclerotic heart disease." Certificate via FamilySearch.

lincecum-letha-elizabeth-deathcertificate

Take all mistakes as good wishes.

10 July 2016

Notes Report for Addison Lysander Lincecum (1874-1965)

drallincecum-farrightTake all mistakes as good wishes.

Image from Fort Worth Star-Telegram (Texas), 3 May 1915.  The caption:  "Left to right:  Dr. Holman Taylor, secretary of the State Medical Association and editor of the State Medical Journal; Dr. W. King, health officer, of San Antonio, and chairman of the board of councilors [sic]; Dr. W. C. Rucker, assistant surgeon general of the United States department of public health; Dr. A. L. Lincecum of Austin, assistant state health officer."

  • From Texas Under Many Flags by Clarence Wharton, American Historical Society, 1930.  Pg 124:
    ADDISON L. LINCECUM.  Three generations of the Lincecum family have been physicians and surgeons in Texas.  Dr. Addison L. Lincecum, who has done a great deal of public health work, is practicing medicine and conducting a high class private hospital at El Campo.

    His grandfather was a physician and a personal friend of General Sam Houston in the early days of the Texas Republic.  He was in his generation a scientist, deeply versed in the physical sciences, and also a thorough physician.  This pioneer doctor of Texas was an uncle of the famous historical character, James Bowie, whose name is associated with the "Bowie Knife," and who was one of the victims of the Alamo massacre.

    Dr. Addison L. Lincecum was born in Washington County, Texas, April 8, 1874.  His father, Lucullus G. Lincecum, was educated in Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia, then the outstanding medical college in the country, and he located in Texas, settled in Washington County in 1848 and in 1878 located at Lampasas, and practiced medicine until his death.  He was a surgeon in the Confederate army.  Dr. Lucullus Lincecum married Fannie Rainwater, a native of Mississippi.  Of their eight children six are deceased.

    Dr. Addison L. Lincecum secured his early education at Lampasas, attending the Centenary College there.  He was matriculated in medicine at the University of Texas at Galveston in 1894, and in 1903 took his diploma from Baylor University.  From 1897 to 1908 he was in practice at Jackson, Texas, and from 1908 to 1914 at El Campo.

    Dr. Lincecum left El Campo to serve as assistant health officer at Austin from 1914 to 1917.  In 1917 he took a commission and went overseas with the One Hundred and Eleventh Engineers, spending thirteen months in France, two months of that time being on the firing line.  He returned home in 1919 and was discharged at Fort Sam Houston in June of that year with the rank of captain.

    After this military service Doctor Lincecum served with the U.S. Veterans Bureau for about six years and in 1925 returned to El Campo and resumed his private practice, and since 1927 has also conducted a well equipped private hospital there.  Doctor Lincecum is president of the City and County Medical Society.  In addition to his professional work he has a large amount of real estate and other business interests to occupy a portion of his time.  He is a Republican, member of the Christian Church, and is a Lodge and Royal Arch Chapter Mason.

    Doctor Lincecum married October 24, 1897, Miss Letha Gandy.  Mrs. Lincecum is a Texas author, has been an investigator and writer on historical topics, and many of her writings have been published and have secured for her special recognition and honors from the university and other institutions.  Her great-grandfather, John Gandy, of North Carolina, was a soldier in the American Revolution.  Her parents were Barnabas P. and Mary (Allen) Gandy, her father a native of Alabama and her mother of Mississippi.  Doctor and Mrs. Lincecum have three children, Barney, Ruth and Addison, Jr.  Barney of Houston.  Ruth is the wife of Ray Hilton, a chemist at Houston, and they have a daughter, Dorothy and son, Addison III.  Addison, Jr., is a pupil in the public schools at Washington, D.C.

  • "The Addison Lincecums are a happy, gay, hospitable people and their household is much as Gideon's must have been.  All the Lincecums are musical.  Dr. Addison was regarded as the champion fiddle player in El Campo [Texas]." [Source:  Gideon Lincecum, 1793-1874 by Lois Burkhalter.  Page 87.]

  • "Born in Washington County, Texas, Addison L. Lincecum (1874-1965) graduated with the first class of Baylor University Medical School in 1903. For most of his life, Lincecum practiced medicine in El Campo, where he lived with his wife Letha Gandy Lincecum and their three children. During the Spanish-American War, he served with Teddy Roosevelt’s Rough Riders, and he fought Pancho Villa’s encroachments on the Texas border as a Texas Ranger in the 1910s. In World War I, Lincecum served as a combat surgeon in France, participating in the Meuse-Argonne and Saint-Mihiel campaigns. Upon returning to the states, he founded and served as first commander for an American Legion Post at El Campo. In 1920, at the outbreak of bubonic plague, Governor James E. Ferguson sent Lincecum to Galveston, later appointing him to the State Board of Health. Lincecum also served one term as mayor of El Campo (1932), acted as the town’s postmaster (1935-1949), and established (1939) and superintended the Nightingale Hospital for 10 years. Additionally, Lincecum became a reporter and commentator for the El Campo radio station KULP at the age of 80." [Via Ancestry family tree.  Uploaded 2011 by choctaw1637.  Cited as "Addison L Lincecum Papers, 1908-1965" processed by Kathy Herzik, Jean Difloe and Julia Payne.  Repository listed as Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin, Travis County, Texas, USA.  Dated 1981.]

  • Addison can be found in Morrison & Fourmy's General Directory Of The City Of Galveston [Texas], 1895-96.  He is listed as a medical student.

  • Addison worked his way through medical school as an engineer on trains transporting granite blocks for Galveston jetties.

    He was elected vice-president of the Texas Medical Association in 1912.  He went to Cuba as a physician with Roosevelt's Rough Riders.  He was commissioned a Texas Ranger in 1917, and he served as captain with the 36th Division in World War I.  [Source:  Gideon Lincecum, 1793-1874 by Lois Burkhalter.  Page 86.]

  • 111th Engineer Regiment, 1917
    MOTTO:  "Fortis et Fidelis" - "Brave and Faithful"
    FORMATION:  Company A, Texas Engineers was organized in Port Arthur in 1916, followed by Company B shortly after, redesignated from artillery to engineers.  Other units were formed after that date.  B company was ordered to Camp Travis in San Antonio to supervise construction at that post.  The entire Texas engineer unit was called to federal services on August 15, 1917.  The Engineers were redesignated as the 111th Engineer Regiment in October 1917 with the First Oklahoma Engineer battalion included to form second battalion of the regiment.  Included in the ranks of the 111th were "400 cowboys," including most of Comapny C, First Battalion, from Sweetwater.  The unit completed the work begun at Camp Bowie, building a road system and the "Benbrook trench system." The Benbrook trenches stretched, upon completion, for more than ten miles along both sides of the Texas and Pacific Railroad southwest of Fort Worth.
    WORLD WAR ONE SERVICE:  The unit arrived in France July 1918, and was assigned with the 36th Division to the Bar-sur-Aube.  The Engineers were quickly called into service after arrival, assigned Corps Engineers for the First Corps in September, repairing roads, filling captured trenches and building bridges.  After five days near St. Mihiel, the unit moved by night march into the Argonne Forest.  The regiment spent most of October following the American advance, providing vital road building work as the armies advanced, ending the war near Sedan.  Cleaning German mines in the line of advance was particularly dangerous part of the work of the unit.  The unit was mustered out of service at Camp Bowie, Fort Worth, Texas in May 1919.  [Source:  Texas Military Forces Museum - http://www.texasmilitaryforcesmuseum.org/36division/archives/111/111lin.htm]

  • From Texas World War I Records, 1917-1920 via FamilySearch.org (citing Texas Military Forces Museum, Austin)
    Lincecum, Addison Lysander
    Residence:  El Campo, Wharton Co, Texas
    Born:  Long Point, Washington, Tex Apr 8/1874
    Called into Active Service as:  Capt MC Apr 3/18 fr ORC
    Organizations and staff assignments:  111 Engrs to ---; 827 Bn TC to May 6/19; 156 Dep Brig to disch
    Principal Stations:  Camp Greenleaf Ga; Camp Mills NY; AEF; Camp Jackson SC; Ft Sam Houston Tex
    Engagements:  none
    Served overseas:  June 8/18 to May 3/19
    Hon. disch:  May 27/19

  • Addison served on the (Texas) state board of health, investigating bubonic plague.  He was mayor of El Campo, Texas.  He developed a long practice, served as superintendent of a hospital and as postmaster, and he conducted a weekly radio current-events forum.  [Source:  Gideon Lincecum, 1793-1874 by Lois Burkhalter.  Pages 86 & 87.]

  • In 1930, Addison owned a $6,000 home with a radio (per census).  He was also noted as a World War veteran.  According to the 1940 US Federal census for Wharton County, Texas, Dr. A. L. Lincecum had completed 7 years of college.  He had worked all 52 weeks of 1939, and his income was $2,600.

  • Dallas Morning News (Texas)
    7 December 1965
    Widely Known Physician, Dr. A. L. Lincecum, Dies
    EL CAMPO, Texas (AP) - Dr. A. L. Lincecum, last surviving member of the Baylor Medical School's first graduating class and widely known country doctor for 5o years, died Monday. He was 91.

    Moments after his daughter, Mrs. Ruth Crosby, a want ads employee for the Houston Post, learned of his death at his isolated ranch near El Campo, her husband, certified public accountant T. A. Crosby, 64, suffered a fatal heart attack.

    Dr. Lincecum set up practice in Wharton County a few years after his graduation in 1903 from the medical school. He retired in 1953 and devoted himself to his role of "roving reporter" for KULP radio station in El Campo until he was paralyzed by a stroke in 1958.

    He was a soldier with Teddy Roosevelt's Rough Riders in the Spanish-American War, got a special Texas Rangers commission to help hunt the bandit Pancho Villa in Mexico after a fellow doctor and friend was killed in a border raid, and served as a combat surgeon in France in World War I.

    He is credited with making the first report that the malaria-bearing anopheles mosquito from Mexico was in this country in 1905. He later won recognition for research on bubonic plague.

    Funeral services for Dr. Lincecum will be held at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday in the Wheeler Funeral Chapel in El Campo.

    In addition to his daughter, he is survived by two sons, Bill Lincecum and Barney Lincecum. Dr. Lincecum's wife, Letha, died in 1959.

  • Amarillo Globe-Times (Texas), 7 December 1965:
    Baylor Medical Original Grad Dies at Age 91
    EL CAMPO (AP) -- The last surviving member of Baylor Medical School's first graduating class, Dr. A. L. Lincecum, 91, is dead.

    Lincecum was at his ranch home near El Campo when death came Monday.  He had been paralyzed since a stroke in 1958.

    A few years after his graduation from the medical school in 1903, Lincecum set up medical practice in Wharton County.  He retired in 1953.

    He is survived by a daughter and two sons.

    Funeral services are set for 1:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Wheeler Funeral Home in El Campo.

  • lincecum-addison-l-deathcertAddison's death certificate (via FamilySearch.org) gives his cause of death as "generalized arteriosclerosis."

  • Addison's headstone has an arrowhead embedded in it to honor his Army division.  See I'll Take What I Can Get (This Time It's Personal) at the Southern Graves blog.

  • The Cuero Record (Texas)
    Thursday, 9 December 1965 [via "The Portal to Texas History" – texashistory.unt.edu]
    Dr. Addison L. Lincecum, Pioneer Texan, is Dead
    Dr. Addison L. Lincecum, 91-year-old retired physician, died early Monday at his son's home in Gandy's Bend above Morales in Jackson Co, according to the Yoakum Herald-Times.

    Dr. Lincecum, a veteran of the Spanish-American War and the St. Michiel and Argonne-Meuse offensives of World War I, was a former administrator of the Nightingale Hospital at El Campo.  He moved to Louise in 1910 and established his practice in El Campo in 1911.

    Dr. Lincecum was a member of a pioneer Texas family and the son and grandson of physicians.

    Four hours after his daughter, Mrs. T. A. Crosby, of Houston learned of her father's death, her husband died of a heart attack at his home.

    In addition to being a physician, Dr. Lincecum was a railroad engineer, Texas Ranger and postmaster and mayor in El Campo.  He was superintendent of the Wharton Co. Nightingale Hospital for ten years and of the Wharton Co. Hospital for three years.  He worked his way through school as a railroad engineer.

    Dr. Lincecum was paralyzed by a stroke in 1958.

    He was the first physician to report on the malaria bearing anophelos mosquito from Mexico in 1905.  He was in Brownsville when raiders of the Mexican bandit, Pancho Villa, killed a fellow doctor who was a good friend of Dr. Lincecum.  He asked for a special Ranger commission and accompanied U. S. forces into Mexico to track down the raiders.

    Dr. Lincecum volunteered for service in Teddy Roosevelt's Rough Riders and in WWI joined up with the 36th Division as army surgeon.

    Funeral services were held Wednesday at 1:30 p.m. at Wheeler Funeral Home in El Campo with John Cope of The First Christian Church officiating.  Military burial was at 3 p.m. in the family plot at Gandy's Bend.

    In addition to his daughter, Dr. Lincecum is survived by two sons, Bill of Gretna, La., and Barney with whom he had lived since 1960.  His wife, Mrs. Letha Gandy Lincecum died in 1959.

    Funeral services for his son-in-law, T. A. Crosby, were held Tuesday at 4 p.m. in Houston.

See also:
- Individual Facts Report for Addison Lysander Lincecum (1874-1965)
- Timeline Report for Addison Lysander Lincecum (1874-1965)

09 July 2016

Timeline Report for Addison Lysander Lincecum (1874-1965)

draddisonllincecum1911Addison witnessed much during his lifetime:  6 wars, the assassinations of 2 U.S. presidents, the Wright Brothers' 1st flight, the 1st manufacturing of the Ford Model T, the sinking of the Titanic, women's suffrage in the U.S., the Great Depression, the Holocaust, the Dust Bowl, the attack on Pearl Harbor, the nuclear bombings in Japan, and the Civil Rights Movement.

His most eventful years were perhaps 1900-1903, ages 26-29.  Addison lost his father and helped Letha give birth to their 1st child about August 1900.  He officially became a doctor a couple of years later, and was part of the 1st graduating class of Baylor University.  Letha gave birth to daughter Ruth about this time, as well.

Image at right from The Houston Post (Texas), Vol. 27, Ed. 1 Sunday, 21 May 1911.  Accessed 3 July 2016, University of North Texas Libraries, "The Portal to Texas History," texashistory.unt.edu .

Pattern:  Year / Age – Event – Date / Place

1874 – Addison Lysander Lincecum was born – 8 April at Long Point, Washington County, Texas

1880 / Age 6 – Addison was enumerated for the 10th United States census – 2 June at Lampasas, Texas

1897 / Age 23 – Addison married Letha Elizabeth Gandy – 24 October at Lavaca County, Texas

1898 / Age 24 – Addison witnessed the Spanish-American War – April thru August / USA, Cuba

1900 / Age 26 – Addison was enumerated for the 12th United States census – 23 June at Jackson, Texas

1900 / Age 26 – Addison's father, L. G. Lincecum, died – abt August / Lampasas, Texas

1900 / Age 26 – Letha gave birth to Addison's first child, a son, Barnabas Gandy Lincecum – 29 August at Lavaca County, Texas

1901 / Age 27 – President William McKinley was assassinated – 6 September at Buffalo, New York

1902 / Age 28 – Addison graduated from Dallas Medical College – 15 April at Dallas, Texas

1903 / Age 28 – Addison was part of the 1st graduating class of Baylor University – Waco, Texas

1903 / Age 29 – Letha gave birth to Addison's first daughter, Ruth Elizabeth Lincecum – 28 August at Morales, Jackson County, Texas

1903 / Age 29 – Wright Brothers took their 1st flight – 17 September at Kitty Hawk, Dare County, North Carolina

1908 / Age 34 – the Ford Model T was 1st manufactured – September / Detroit, Michigan

1910 / Age 36 – Addison was enumerated for the 13th United States census – 28 April at El Campo, Wharton County, Texas

1912 / Age 38 – the Titanic sank – April / Atlantic Ocean

1913 / Age 38 – Letha gave birth to Addison's 2nd son, Addison Turney Lincecum – 19 February at Long Point, Washington County, Texas

1914 / Age 39 – Addison became Assistant (Texas State) Health Officer – Austin, Travis County, Texas

1914 / Age 40 – Addison participated in World War I – Europe

1920 / Age 45 – women received the right to vote – USA

1920 / Age 45 – Addison was enumerated for the 14th United States census – 21 January at El Campo, Wharton County, Texas

1929 / Age 54 – stock market crash and Great Depression – USA, Europe

1930 / Age 55 – the Holocaust – Eastern Europe

1930 / Age 56 – Addison was enumerated for the 15th United States census – 19 April at El Campo, Wharton County, Texas

1931 / Age 56 – the Dust Bowl – Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas

1936/ Age 61 – Addison was appointed U.S. Postmaster – El Campo, Wharton County, Texas

1939 / Age 65 – World War II – Europe, the Pacific

1940/ Age 66 – Addison was enumerated for the 16th United States census – 24 June at El Campo, Wharton County, Texas

1941 / Age 67 – Pearl Harbor was attacked – 7 December at Honolulu, Hawaii

1945 / Age 71 – Hiroshima & Nagasaki Nuclear bombings – August / Japan

1947 / Age 72 – Cold War

1950 / Age 76 – Korean War

1955 / Age 80 – the Civil Rights Movement – USA

1959 / Age 85 – Vietnam War

1959 / Age 85 – Letha, Addison's wife of 62 years, died – 27 December at El Campo, Wharton County, Texas

1963 / Age 89 – John F. Kennedy was assassinated – 22 November at Dallas, Texas

1965 / Age 91 – Addison Lysander Lincecum died – 6 December at Lavaca County, Texas

Sources available upon request.

See also:
- Individual Facts Report for Addison Lysander Lincecum (1874-1965)
- Notes Report for Addison Lysander Lincecum (1874-1965)

08 July 2016

Individual Facts Report for Addison Lysander Lincecum (1874-1965)

draddisonllincecum1915Addison Lysander Lincecum was born 8 April 1874 at Long Point, Washington County, Texas to Lucullus Garland Lincecum and Fannie Rainwater.  Addison died 6 December 1965 in Lavaca County, Texas, and was buried at Gandy Cemetery.  The cemetery located in Gandy Bend, Lavaca County.

Addison carried the title of Dr., and I have found him listed as Addison L. Lincicum, A. L. Lincecum, and Addison L. Lincecum.

Addison married Letha Elizabeth Gandy 24 October 1897 in Lavaca County.  They had three children:  Barnabas Gandy Lincecum, Ruth Elizabeth Lincecum, and Addison Turney Lincecum.

Source for image at right:  The Houston Post. (Texas), Vol. 29, No. 293, Ed. 1 Thursday, January 21, 1915, Houston, Texas. Accessed 30 June 2016, University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, texashistory.unt.edu .

Individual Facts

  • Census:  2 June 1880 / Lampasas, Lampasas County, Texas
  • Education:  1894 / University of Texas at Galveston
  • Occupation:  1897-1908 / Medical Practice at Jackson
  • Census:  23 June 1900 / Jackson County
  • Graduation:  15 April 1902 / Dallas Medical College at Dallas
  • Graduation:  1903 / Baylor University Medical School at Waco
  • Residence:  August 1903 / Morales, Jackson County
  • Occupation:  1908-1914 / Medical Practice at El Campo, Wharton County
  • Census:  28 April 1910 / El Campo, Wharton County, Texas (Post Office Street)
  • Occupation:  1914-1918 / Assistant Health Officer at Austin, Travis county
  • Address:  1918 / 1205 Rio Grande, Austin
  • Residence:  1918-1919 / El Campo, Wharton Couunty
  • Occupation:  January 1920 / General Practice Physician at El Campo
  • Census:  21 January 1920 / El Campo, Wharton County
  • Occupation:  April 1930 / General Practice Physician at Wharton County
  • Census:  19 April 1930 / El Campo, Wharton County
  • Residence:  1935 / El Campo, Wharton County
  • Residence:  abt 1936 / El Campo, Wharton County
  • Occupation:  1936-1948 / U.S. Postmaster in El Campo, Wharton County
  • Census:  24 June 1940 / El Campo, Wharton County (300 Mechanic St)
  • Residence:  1959-1965 / Lavaca County
  • Occupation:  bef. 1965 / Doctor at Lavaca County
  • Address:  abt 1965 / Edna Star Route, Gandy Bend

Sources available upon request.

See also:
- Timeline Report for Addison Lysander Lincecum (1874-1965)
- Notes Report for Addison Lysander Lincecum (1874-1965)

07 July 2016

Introduction to My Last Name, and Why a One-Name Study

My last name is Lincecum.  A story of that name was passed down to me from my grandfather, Billy Joe Lincecum, in a genealogy report he compiled more than 26 years ago.

LINSEYCOMB to LINCECUM

The desire for freedom was an old Lincecum tradition which began when Paschal, the son of a French mother and a British father, fled his native France for America.  He brought with him his French wife and infant son, Gideon, and in the new country changed the spelling of the family name from LINSEYCOMB to LINCECUM......

Re:  Chapter one (Page 7), Gideon Lincecum 1793-1874, a Biography, By: Lois Wood Burkhalter.

DEFINITIONS FROM THE DICTIONARY

Linseywoolsey.......A coarse fabric woven from linenwarp and coarse wool filling...

Comb...............Any comb like instrument, a toothed piece of bone, metal, etc., a card for dressing wool.

Linseycomb..........An instrument for combing linsey, one who combs linsey....

Conducting a one-name study of the Lincecum surname has been a desire of mine for many, many years.  I consider such a study to be a large undertaking, and suppose the commitment is what has previously stopped me from taking the first step.

Lincecum is an unusual surname.  Tim has made it somewhat famous, but prolific it is not.  According to worldnames.publicprofiler.org, for every million people in the United States, less than two have the surname Lincecum.  Here is a screen shot of where we reside.

Shouldn't take long to cover it (at least in the U.S.), right? Well, I'm not so sure about that.  One of the bigger goals I hope to achieve with this one-name study is to find connections, if there are any, to what I believe are variants of the surname.  For example, are Lincecums related to Linthicums? I really want to answer that one.  Using the same source, Linthicum has a frequency per million of 8.64 in the U.S. alone.  Canada comes in second with 1.6 FPM.

Linscomb is another one.  The frequency per million in the United States is even lower than Lincecum, but we reside in a lot of the same areas.  We've got to be related, right? There are even more variations I could list, but you get the idea.

Though not new to genealogy, I am new to this particular focus.  I expect to rely heavily on the Guild of One-Name Studies for help in getting started, at least.  Anyone else ever conducted a one-name study? Got any tips?

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